10 Edible Plants To Grow Indoors

edible plants

 

 

edible plants to grow indoors

If you’ve got a green thumb but don’t have a lot of outdoor space, you may think gardening is a pipe dream.  But think again!  There’s more you can do with your indoor space than potted plants and succulents!  If you like to eat your efforts, this list of edible plants you can grow indoors is for you.  It may take a little more creativity, engineering and planning, but indoor gardening is great for those who live in apartments, condos or have regulations on outdoor gardens in their area.  These 10 plants are commonly grown outside, but can easily be translated into indoor plants with a few alterations and accommodations.

 

1. Avocados

Avocado_604_0

It’s true that you can grow an avocado plant simply using a pit, but this type will likely yield no edible fruit.  Instead, plant a dwarf avocado tree in a large pot with sand in the bottom.  Remember to allow for drainage and water regularly, but never make it soggy.  You’ll need tall ceilings for this type of tree – even dwarf trees can grow to 10 feet.

 

2. Carrots

Carrots require a bit of room, but aren’t particularly finicky to grow.  Start with a window box or pot that’s a foot and a half in length.  After you plant your seeds, keep the soil watered but not soaked.  The seeds should germinate within 2 weeks.

 

3. Tomatoes

If you want to try your hand at indoor tomatoes, all you need is a 6 inch pot (for one plant).  Start with a starter mix of soil and plant your seeds, keeping the soil well-watered but never soggy.  Once the plants start to germinate, transplant them into potting soil.  As your plant gets bigger, you may need to stage it to prevent the stem from breaking.  Tomatoes like sunshine, but not intense heat so pay attention after placing them near windows.

 

4. Mushrooms

Mushrooms can be purchased to grow indoors as a kit, like this one.  You can also use a laundry basket, as with the method shown here.  Basically, you inoculate straw with mushroom spores and stuff them in the laundry basket.  The basket is usually kept in a box or bag until completely colonized.  Mushrooms prefer shade, so it’s not necessary to keep them in a window or sunny spot!

 

5. Green Onions

These are possibly the easiest vegetable to grow indoors.  Simply place the bottom of leftover purchased green onions in an inch of water in a glass.  Place them in a window and allow the shoots to grow for about a week. (be sure to change the water daily!) When they’ve doubled in size, plant them in a small pot.

 

6. Peppers1280518.large

Peppers enjoy warmth and sun, so if you’ve got a nice warm spot by a window, many types of peppers will thrive.  Banana or cherry peppers do well indoors.  Be aware that peppers do like room, so use a pot that’s at least 3-5 gallons.  For ease, try starting from a sprout instead of using seeds.

 

7. Radishes

Radishes are easy to grow whether inside or out, which makes them perfect for a beginner gardener.  They like it warm, so place the container near a window, but move them on particularly hot days.  The best part about radishes is that they’re ripe and mature in only a few weeks!

 

8. Salad GreensLettuce_604

Salad greens are easy to grow in small spaces, beginning either with seeds or “starts”.  Use a planter box that allows for drainage.  Plant your seeds or starts about 4 inches apart, and if using starts, be sure to massage the roots before planting.  Keep the soil continually moist, but don’t overwater.

 

9. Lemons

Lemons grow best in very sunny spaces – with at least 12 hours of sun per day.  If you start with a dwarf tree, you’ll likely be able to harvest fruit the first year.  Plant the tree in a pot that’s slightly larger than the root ball of your tree in soil specifically formulated for citrus trees and water it daily – though be sure not to oversaturate.

 

10. Mandarin Oranges

It’s best to start mandarin oranges as a dwarf tree.  They grow well in spacious pots with very rich soil and lots of drainage.  Place them in very sunny locations and rotate them regularly as you water them to ensure equal sun exposure all over.  The root system will likely grow abundantly, and when the begin to poke through the drainage holes you’ll need to transplant the tree in a container at least 2 inches larger in diameter.

 

If you want a more complete overview of these plants and more, you can read this post on greatist.  More information can also be found here on care2.  See a much more complete list of plants, herbs and tree you can grow indoors on howstuffworks.

Looking for more? Check out these 25 edible garden ideas on Remodelaholic!

 

Featured image via care2

Title image via Better Homes and Gardens

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

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