10 Science Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love

Keep the kids interested in science. 10 Science Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #kids, #education, #homeschool, #books, #reading

 

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If you want to foster a love of science in your elementary aged kids, you’ve got to make it readily accessible at home.  Science class is great for teaching basics and fundamentals, but supplementing what they learn at school is key to a more well-rounded education and deeper understanding.  One great way to reinforce science concepts is by reading books with your children.  Here are 10 great Science books 9-11 year olds will want to read over and over!

Keep the kids interested in science. 10 Science Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #kids, #education, #homeschool, #books, #reading

1. Big Book of Why: 1001 Facts Kids Want to Know, by the editors of TIME for Kids Magazine – It’s no secret, kids are curious critters.  Sometimes the questions pile up high and parents have a hard time answering!  That’s when this book comes in handy.  Why do we have eyebrows?  What’s the fastest a human can run?  What’s the deepest point on Earth?  The highest?  Kids can find all of this and more.  The book is divided into subjects and covers lots of different scientific areas – humans, animals, environment/nature, technology and space – and it’s full of photos and illustrations to represent the science and history behind each question/answer.  Once they start reading, they won’t be able to stop!  They’ll want to wow their teachers and parents with all the fun facts they learn.

 

2. Extreme Weatherby H. Michael Mogil –  This book is full to the brim with amazing images and quality diagrams on everything from types of storms to how to observe weather to places known for their specific extreme weather conditions.  The images – taken at unique and unexpected angles from up-close in the action will take readers right inside the book.  The text answers likely questions about weather and will guide your kids to a better understanding.  It’s an engaging follow-up to meteorology basics and a fun read.

 

3. The Elephant Scientistby Caitlin O’Connell and Donna M. Jackson –  This book chronicles the research and findings of Caitlin O’Connell, an American scientist who traveled to Namibia to research Elephants in their natural habitat.  Set in the African scrub desert, this book includes breathtaking photographs that will truly engage young readers.  O’Connell’s observations of elephant behavior led to a groundbreaking discovery in her field.  For those interested in Biology and Animal Sciences, this is a great representation of the field.

 

4. Naked Eggs and Flying Potatoes: Unforgettable Experiments That Make Science Fun, by Steve Spangler - This book is written and endorsed by the original creator of the mentos geyser!  Inside your kids will find extraordinary science experiments they can do with household items.  This isn’t your average science – these tricks are sure to entertain and amaze, all while your kids learn more about the why’s and how’s!

 

5. Stronger Than Steel: Spider Silk DNA and the Quest for Better Bulletproof Vests, Sutures, and Parachute Rope, by Bridget Heos – In this captivating book, kids enter the Science lab of Randy Lewis whose research centers on spider silk and its benefits and uses in human life applications.  Through photographs and exciting factual presentation, kids learn about golden orb weaver spiders, and transgenic alfalfa, silkworm silk, and goats, whose milk contains the proteins to spin spider silk–and to weave a nearly indestructible fiber!  They’ll be fascinated to discover the applications: from improving body armor and strengthening parachute tethers, to repairing human bones and ligaments!  This is an exciting look into the world of genetic medicine, with some focus given to the ethical concerns of genetic research.

 

6. Great Scientists, by Jacqueline Fortey –  Great Scientists takes a look at the world’s pioneering scientist, their most popular discoveries and relevance to us today.  The book begins with Aristotle, highlights Archimedes, William Harvey, Louis Pasteur, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Edwin Hubble (among many others), and ends with Stephen Hawking.  It’s an overview of leading discoveries and life’s work in the vast field of science and shows a bit about many subcategories.  Each scientist is afforded a summary of work and contribution to the science community and historical effect, some personal information, a timeline, and a photograph.  This is a very in depth look at very important leading scientists that have shaped our knowledge and view of the world and a wonderful introduction to the history of science concepts.  It is interesting and engaging, and will give kids a desire for more.

 

7. Something Stinks! by Gail Hedick, When dead fish continue to wash ashore of the Higdon River, a determined young lady decides to find out why.  At first mocked by her seventh grade classmates, she eventually persuades them to help in her investigation.  They’re led to factories, farms, golf courses and all over town, and their discoveries eventually land them in trouble with law enforcement.  Can a group of kids really solve the puzzle and fix the source of the problem?  While fictional in content, this book sheds light on serious, real-life issues and has been awarded for its outstanding Science content by the NSTA-CBC Outstanding Science Committee.

 

8. Eruption! Volcanoes and the Science of Saving Lives, by Elizabeth Rusch – This exciting and action packed book begins by detailing the 1985 eruption of Colombia’s Nevado del Ruiz, one of the most devastating volcanic events known.  With amazing real-time photography and engaging sidebar notes and facts, this book chronicles the perils of living in volcano danger zones – as more than one billion people do today.  It also recounts the life-saving missions of the International Volcano Crisis Team.  This is one book about science they won’t be able to put down!

 

9. The Periodic Table: Elements With Style, by Simon Dasher and Adrian Dingle – This super witty book introduces kids to Chemistry and the elements in a new and engaging way.  The pages are designed to resemble popular networking sites online, and each element is given their own homepage.  Kids will love reading through the funny and informative “profiles” – each personally written by the elements themselves – and watching for profile pics that represent their “personalities”!

(Bonus: Look for other Simon Basher books, too!  Each has the same entertaining illustrations and design, along with the witty writing and style typical of Basher.  There’s Astronomy: Out of This World, Physics: Why Matter Matters, Biology: Life as We Know It, Human Body: A Book With Guts, and more about Science, Technology, History and Math!)

 

10. The Elements: a Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe, by Theodore Gray – Do not be put off by the intimidating title or the length of this book.  The Elements is the perfect aid in teaching your kids about atoms and elements.  Each page is broken into sections for easy visualization – so there is detailed information without overwhelming the eye.  Bright, bold photographs of the elements in their true form accompany the text, along with sidebar images that show various real-world applications of each element.  Explained in a way that makes elements fun and personal, the text and graphics are easily accessible, even to children.  The gorgeous photographs alone will excite readers and ignite an interest in Chemistry.

(Bonus: See also Theodore Grays’ sequel to Elements, Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything and Marcus Chown’s Solar System: A Visual Exploration of the Planets, Moons and Other Heavenly Bodies that Orbit Our Sun.  Both of these are done in the same eye-catching, invigorating and exciting style.)

 Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

More Education Inspiration:

De-Mystifying Math - Tipsaholic.com          10 Math Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love          De-Mystifying Math

Math Activities                       Math Books                           Supplementing Math Education

10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

 

valentine activities

 

Valentine’s Day is the perfect time to pull out the paints and doilies, glue and glitter, pipe cleaners and paper and let your kids have a blast!  There are many fun Valentine activities for kids that can encourage creativity and inspire learning. Doing some projects together can make this an even more special time of year. Here are a few ideas to get your creative juices flowing.

 

1. Amp up your learning with Valentine Activity Trays

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

There are several ideas for Valentine-themed trays at this link that will help with counting and numbers, color recognition, letters and spelling, matching, small motor skills, hand-eye coordination and more!  Plus, they look totally fun.

 

2. Make Valentine Sensory Bottles. 

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Use the free printable to add a tag to let your kids know they’ve got you “all shook up!”

 

3. Paint with homemade heart sponges.

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Whip out your red, purple and pink paints and let your kids make a painted heart collage.  Throw in some glitter for even more fun!

 

4. Feed the birds

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

All you need are pipe cleaners and cereal to make these cute and colorful bird feeders to hang outside!  Your little ones will love threading Fruit Loops onto pipe cleaners and shaping them into hearts.

 

5. Glam up with some DIY heart glasses. 

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

When all the cereal is gone, use the boxes and leftover pipe cleaners to upcycle some fun heart shaped glasses to wear all day!  You can even use red cellophane paper for the “lenses”!

 

6. Create these little “love bugs” from clothespins, craft sticks and pom poms!

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Add a magnet to the back to turn them into magnetic clips.  You and your kids will have a great time making fuzzy bugs and they can give them away as gifts to their loved ones!

 

7. Punch a Bunch.

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Of cups, that is.  There’s a game kids can’t resist called “punch a bunch” where you basically fill some paper cups with prizes, cover them with tissue paper and let the kids punch through to the prize.  This Valentine themed punch a bunch game, called “My Heart is Bursting” would be awesome at a party with a ton of kids, or used with 14 cups as an advent countdown to Valentine’s Day!

 

8. Scatter love all over. 

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Make some love rocks by collecting stones from outside and painting them.  Once they’ve dried, deliver them anonymously to places and people who need to feel a little love!  Think hospitals, nursing homes, doctor’s offices, bus stops.  Place them around park benches and by doors.  Line a neighbors walkway.  But be sneaky!

 

9. Shoot some arrows – dessert style!

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

Create cupid arrows with skewers, sparkly paper and donut holes.  Your kids will like making them almost as much as eating them!

 

10. Weave some baskets

There are lots of great projects and crafts you can do with your kids around Valentine's Day. 10 Fun Valentine Activities for Kids - tipsaholic, #valentine, #valentine's #valentinesday #kids, #education, #crafts

These Danish Heart baskets are inexpensive and fairly simple to create.  When you’re done weaving them into a heart shape, you can fill them with little treats and drop them off at your loved ones houses!  Or hide them under family members’ pillows!

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Need some more valentine inspirations?

Preschool girl holding paper heart        couple with flowers in the city         Red hearts

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5 Hands-On Science Activities for 6-9 Year Olds

Keep the kids busy at home with science activities. Supplement their education and have fun. 5 Hands-On Science Activities for 6-9 Year Olds - Tipsaholic, #science, #scienceexperiment, #experiments, #kids

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As important as it is to teach your children the basics of science and reinforce the concepts they learn in school, it’s even more important to DO science with your kids!  Kids learn best by doing – whether they fail or succeed at a specific task, acquiring information in a meaningful way is always easier when they are fully engaged.  Luckily, science is full of fun experiments that help illustrate scientific behaviors and concepts.  Here are 8 science activities for 6-9 year olds that will be sure to grab their attention!

 

1. Fantastic Foamy Fountain – Science Bob

This fun demonstration creates an exothermic reaction, and is a great way to teach your kids about chemicals and the way they interact.  You can also teach them about catalysts, as it uses yeast as a trigger for the foaming reaction.  Kids of all ages will get a kick out of the growing foam – it seems like magic!  Until you talk about the science behind it.

 

2. Swimming Spaghetti (and other weird experiments) – Boys’ Life

This easy peasy science demonstration uses things you’ve got in your pantry, so you can do it today!  Break spaghetti into small pieces and watch them sink to the bottom of a glass of water.  Add vinegar to the water and see what happens to the spaghetti then!  Baking soda and vinegar react chemically, creating carbon dioxide – you can explain the science behind it as you cook the rest of the spaghetti for dinner!

 

3. Rock Candy – About Education

Not only is this a fun science activity, but you can eat the result – something your kids are going to love!  All you need is rough string (or wood skewers), water, sugar and food coloring!  Set the experiment up in a glass jar so you can watch what happens while it’s going on.  Be sure to talk about the key science concepts of saturation, precipitation and evaporation.  If you want a scientific explanation for what’s happening, see here.  Once you’re done watching your crystals grow and talking about the science, share the rock candy with friends and family!

 

4. Homemade Gak – Li’l Luna

What kid wouldn’t love making their own slime?  Gak is a fun, slimy, play dough type material with interesting qualities and behaviors.  The science behind this one involves state of being – solids, liquids, gas, etc.  Gak is a non-Newtonian fluid, which is basically a liquid that’s not “normal”.  For younger kids, discussion of state of being is likely enough, but if you’d like to delve deeper, you can also talk about polymers, and how molecules form to create them.  Read the science behind it here.

 

5. Rainbow in a Glass – My Kids’ Adventures

This is demonstration creates an awesome visual your kids will love.  It’s a colorful, fun way to show them how density works.  Basically, you stack liquids of different types which have been treated with food coloring onto each other in a glass jar.  The different densities won’t mix, but will separate and show as stripes.  Not only is this visually interesting, but it will give you an opportunity to talk about density, and thus volume and mass.

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

More education fun:

De-Mystifying Math - Tipsaholic.com        literacy education         8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Science Education - Tipsaholic

Math Education                    Literacy Education               Science Education

8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Science Education (Ages 6-9)

You can reinforce your child's education at home with little effort! Here are 8 tips for supplementing your child's science education to get you started. 8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Science Education - Tipsaholic, #science, #education, #kids, #school

 

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There are so many different aspects and directions a science education can take.  There’s chemistry and molecules, health sciences, natural sciences, earth science and geology, meteorology, physics, biology, plant and animal science, machines, electromagnetics, and that’s just to name a few!  With all of these different elements, plus the basic knowledge of scientific theory and processes, it’s hard to know where to start with your kids’ science education!  Reinforcing what they learn at school is crucial, and you can bolster their education and aid in their success with a little bit of effort.  Here are 8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Science Education (Ages 6-9).

 

1. Focus on fun!  At the elementary level, it’s most important to engage kids in a meaningful way – which really means you need to make science fun!  Kids are more likely to retain what they learn if they are interested in the lesson.  For that reason, keep your talks, activities and experiments short and simple so you won’t lose their attention.

 

2. Be involved.  The best way to engage kids at this age?  Lots of visually stimulating demonstrations and hands-on activities that focus on basic concepts in a broad range of science disciplines.  That means you’ll have to get engaged, too.  Participating in the learning process with your children will show them it’s important and encourage their natural curiosity.  So dust off some easy experiments you can do in the kitchen or backyard, read up on the scientific method and make some science lab books with your kids to record data!

 

3. A family af”fair”.  Get everyone involved in scientific discoveries!  Host a family science fair!  One great way to help kids grow more independent and responsible for their education is to have them tackle projects on their own.  So pick a night far enough in advance to give plenty of time for work, research and planning.  Advertise the science fair in a fun way and make it a big celebratory deal!  Everyone in the family can pick their own project and work on it independently and with others when they need help.  For younger kids, you might want to partner up with mom or dad.  Invite other family members, friends or neighbors to participate as well.  Have everyone give a presentation of their project and make sure that there are appropriate rewards for hard work.  Take everyone out for ice cream afterward!

 

4. Don’t ignore your surroundings.  You may do a lot of your educational activities indoors – and why wouldn’t you?  But a large part of science involves nature, so make sure to take things outside once in a while!  Plan plenty of field trips to the park, the forest, the nature preserve, the hiking trails and even the backyard!  There are tons of things you can turn into scientific lessons with very little extra planning or effort.  Bugs!  Worms!  Trees!  Plants!  Cells!  Photosynthesis!  Life cycles, recycling, composting, weather, animals, physical forces such as movement, velocity, speed, inertia, geology… and so much more!  If your kids come up with questions you can’t answer, that’s great!  Write them down together and look up the answer online!

 

5. Utilize local resources.  Chances are there are many resources in your area that perhaps you haven’t even thought about.  Look online or with your cities travel bureau for ideas.  Great places to take your kids that will lead to scientific discussions and discovery include (but are not limited to): working farms, dairies, recycling plants, paper mills, observatories, planetariums, museums, aquariums, nature parks, or even farmer’s markets.  Just check online or call ahead to plan a visit, or ask for a schedule of events.  Libraries, nature trails, museums and even local universities often have special events for kids that focus on different elements of science.

 

6. Communicate.  If you’re supplementing the education your child receives at school, it’s a great idea to receive some guidance from the teacher.  Don’t be afraid to ask what aspects of science they’re working on in class and what they plan to cover throughout the school year.  Teachers can be an amazing resource as well, and can refer you to local classes, activities and places they’ve been made aware of.  They can also recommend applicable books, websites and videos they’ve come across.

 

7. Don’t underestimate yourself.  You may not be a professional teacher, but you’ve got the skills, awareness and resources to be a teacher to your children.  Use everything at your disposal to help you.  Don’t overthink it.  Keep it simple and relevant to their lives.  A great resource for interactive science games, activities, video clips and more is Topmarks.  Individual items are classified by type of science and age range.  Also, check Great Websites for Kids which lists fabulous educational websites by topic.

 

8.  Play off your child.  Know your child’s interests and hobbies.  Relate their science studies to the things they are naturally drawn to.  Understand their strengths and weaknesses.  Encourage them to work on their weaknesses by playing on their strengths.  Don’t push too hard, but don’t underestimate them either.

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

More educational inspiration:

De-Mystifying Math - Tipsaholic.com        literacy education         10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic

Math Education                  Literacy Education               Art Education

10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

Learning with your child can be fun. Teach them in a variety of ways. Teach about art and reading with these 10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #art, #education, #kids, #books, #read, #kidsbooks, #artbooks, #preschool

 

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Art is an important and vastly under-appreciated element of education.  Fortunately, there are a myriad of ways you can supplement art education in your home.  Reading books to your child is one valuable tool for learning.  Children will become better readers and writers while having fun with you and learning about art.  There are so many different aspects of art education you could focus on – history, masters, colors, hues, composition, to name just a few – that it’s hard to know what your focus should be.  Here are 10 art education books geared to preschoolers that your 3-6 year olds will love!

Learning with your child can be fun. Teach them in a variety of ways. Teach about art and reading with these 10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #art, #education, #kids, #books, #read, #kidsbooks, #artbooks, #preschool

1. Art by Patrick McDonnell –

This cute picture book tells the story of Art and his art.  Art is a budding young artist – like so many children.  Follow along and watch as Art creates His fun masterpieces all over the pages of the book.  With rhyming verse and messy, colorful illustrations, this is sure to be a hit with young kids.

 

2. Mini Masters Board Book Series by Julie Merberg and Suzanne Bober –

(Dancing with Degas, A Picnic with Monet, A Magical Day with MatisseIn the Garden with Van Gogh)

These books combine rhyming text, short and simple phrasing and beautiful works from master artists.  Young kids will learn about Degas, Monet, Matisse and Van Gogh in a fun, engaging and positive way.  The artwork is vivid and beautiful and sure to delight even older readers.

 

3. The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds –

“Just make a mark and see where it takes you.” The art teacher says, but Vashti is not convinced.  She is not an artist and instead, she jabs angrily at the paper leaving an unremarkable dot.  That dot, however, leads her on a completely unforeseen adventure through self-discovery and creativity.  Children can learn right along with her as they recognize the value of each person’s unique, creative spirit.

 

4. Perfect Square by Michael Hall –

One perfect square.  But oh!  What a square CAN be!  This adventurous story shows kids how a simple square of construction paper can transform into unlimited possibilities.  Kids will be excited not only for the next page and the coming surprised, but will love applying this in their own creative lives.

 

5. Press Here by Herve Tullet –

This is no mere book about dots and colors, oh no!  Press the dot and the book comes to life, bringing with it a magical, tactile adventure!  Young kids will love following the instructions in this interactive book.  They’ll press, shake, blow, tilt and jab their way through the pages and find delight in the shapes and vibrant colors.

 

6. Beautiful Oops by Barney Saltzberg –

With endearing drawings, vibrant colors and beautiful text, this book gives kids a lovely life lesson.  Mistakes are ok.  In fact, mistakes are great!  They can help you learn and grow, lead to discoveries, and cultivate creativity.  A spill on your masterpiece doesn’t have to ruin it.  Look for a way to turn mistakes into art – when you’re drawing or in life.

 

7. Seen Art? by Jon Scieszka –

This hilarious romp through New York City’s Museum of Modern Art will have your kids begging for more!  When the main character loses track of his friend, Art, he is directed to MoMA instead.  He continues through the museum, looking for his friend, and in the process learns much about famous artists – Matisse, Van Gogh, Picasso and others.  Your kids can learn right alongside him with these playful illustrations and clever, comical text.

 

8. Touch the Art: Count Monet’s Lilies by Julie Appel and Amy Guglielmo –

This is a wonderful introduction to impressionism for very young budding artists with paintings by Monet, Renoir, Cézanne, and Degas to name a few.  This book is a wonderful take on the average “touch and feel” genre and is a tactile experience for young kids who will love feeling bumpy bark on trees, patting fancy hats and counting fruit.  They’ll increase fine motor skills and learn about famous artists at the same time!  (See the other “Touch the Art” books in the series as well)

 

9. The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires –

In this creative tale with vibrant, quirky pictures, the unnamed heroine sets out to create the most magnificent thing.  She has a plan and knows just what she needs to do.  After trying and failing time after time, she decides to give up.  What will happen to her creative vision?  Is it lost for good?  Kids will learn just as much vocabulary from the witty text with fun and functional action words and trilogies of verbs as they will about perseverance, negative emotions and creation.

 

10. The Museum by Susan Verde –

This whimsical look at art is told through charming illustrations and simple, lighthearted text.  Follow the main character on an adventure through an art museum, where each piece speaks to her in a different way.  This playful tale captures the emotion and experience of art, and children will better understand how artwork communicates to others and how they can feel energized to create and express themselves.

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

For more educational ideas try these:

10 Hands-On Math Activities - Tipsaholic.com               tipsaholic-10-math-books-3-6-year-olds-will-love-pinterest-pic              hands on science

Math for 3-6 Year Olds              Math Books 3-6 Year Olds        Science for 3-6 Year Olds

10 Hands-On Math Activities for 9-11 year olds

10 Hands On Math Activities for 9-11 Year Olds - Tipsaholic

If you want to start supplementing your child’s math education, but don’t know where to start, you’ve come to the right place!  Hands-on math activities should engage your child in a multitude of ways — physically, verbally, aurally and visually, just to name a few.  By playing and sharing together, you solidify and reinforce difficult math concepts in a fun way that will help kids love math, not just tolerate it.  Here is a list of 10 great options for your 9-11 year old!

10 math activities for 9-11 year olds

Computer Games:

1. Fractions and Decimals – Topmarks

Here you’ll find great games to help your child learn fractions and decimals, including: Magic Math Market, Fraction Beach, Fraction Flags.

2. Shapes, Position and Movement – Topmarks

Activities like Shapes in Space, 3D Exploration, and Sorting on Venn Diagram will capture your child’s attention and imagination.

3. Interactive Tangrams – Interactive Tangrams

A tangram is a puzzle square cut into seven pieces that can be combined to create different figures or shapes.  On this site, you can solve different puzzles by turning the shapes, dragging and dropping them into place.

4. Online practice problems – Adapted Mine

Adapted Mine has a ton of practice problems broken down by category and grade. You’ll definitely want to bookmark this site for future use!

Printables, etc.

5. Tangram Zoo – Annenberg Learner

This link is for a group of printable animal figures to create different figures and shapes.

6. Oxford Owls Activity Sheets – Oxford Owl

Here you’ll find activity sheets on decimals, fractions, and place value. There are also several links to literacy eBooks for 9-11 year olds.

Game and Activities

7. Fraction Cubes, Math Fact Bingo and Dominoes – eHow contributor, Shannon Hill

Playing games like math bingo and dominoes will give your child a chance to have fun while staying challenged.

8. Dry Erase Decimal Activity – Snaps for Fourth Grade

This first-time teacher has some great tips and math activities for you to try with your child.

9. Temperature Card Game – Education.com

Your child will learn about negative and positive integers while determining the direction of temperature on a thermometer with this fun card game

10. M&M Math – Our Journey Westward

Who knew that candy could be such a good teaching tool? You’ll find a multitude of math activities your child can do with M&Ms.

Education.com has a ton of game ideas for this age range.  Check them out here.

 

Feature image via Tutor Nerds

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Math Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love

math books your 9-11 year old will love

Math isn’t all worksheets and flashcards.  It can be a lot of fun, too!  Reading is a great way to learn together and reinforce concepts.  The following 10 books are a perfect place to start when you’re looking for math books for your 9-11 year old.

10 math books 9-11 years old will love

1. The Grapes of Math by Greg Tang

A book of riddles with tried and true, creative methods for solving math problems by the author.  The vibrant illustrations and fun games will be a hit with kids.  Using effective and simple methods to solve the riddles will give your child confidence.

2. A Very Improbable Story by Edward Einhorn

One morning, Ethan awakes to find an unusual cat – Odds, stuck on his head.  To get rid of the cat, Ethan must win a game of probability, such as pick out two matching socks from his drawer or pull a dime from his coin collection, or some other equally improbable feat.  If he can’t beat the odds, Odds won’t budge, and there’s a 100% chance that Ethan will miss his soccer game!  With this fun plot, entertaining characters and engaging illustrations, this is book is a surefire hit with kids.  It teaches a difficult to grasp concept in a fun way.

3. Math for all Seasons by Greg Tang

More fun riddles and problems to solve in mind-stretching ways.  Great for building Math vocabulary, creativity, and confidence.

4. Math Curse by Jon Scieszka

Do you ever have one of those days where everything is a problem??  This book follows a girl throughout a day filled with “problems” – MATH problems!  A fun look at everyday math.  Charming illustrations with a fun and engaging plot line will have kids begging you to read it.

5. Full House: An Invitation to Fractions by Dayle Ann Dods

Whimsical illustrations and a cast of hilarious characters flow through this book of rhyming text.  Miss Bloom runs the Strawberry Inn and loves to have visitors.  One night, she finds herself with a full house.  Sensing something is amiss, she discovers her guests hungry for a midnight snack.  Will there be enough cake for everyone?  A very inviting read for kids.

6. Mummy Math: An Adventure in Geometry by Cindy Neuschwander

The Zills family is summoned to Egypt to aid in finding the burial chamber of an ancient pharaoh.  When the kids get trapped in a hidden tomb, they must use the geometric hieroglyphics and their knowledge of math to find the burial chamber and escape the tomb.  Will they make it out?  Do they know their stuff?  With a riddle, a mystery and plenty of opportunity for flexing math muscles, kids are sure to find this adventure fun, time and time again.

7. A Remainder of One by Elinor J. Pinczes

When a queen demands that her bugs march in even lines, it’s up to Private Joe to divide and conquer.  Can he split the ants into lines evenly, so he will not be left out?  How many lines will it take?  Fun little drawings will invite young readers in, while the story line engages and teaches a valuable lesson in division.

8. How Big is a Foot? by Rolf Myller

The king wants to give the queen something special for her birthday — not easy when the queen has EVERYTHING.  Except…a bed.  You see, beds hadn’t yet been invented.  The king must figure out “how big is a bed?” – but no one knows!  A cute, fun story with quirky illustrations that will have kids guessing and estimating in measurements.

9. Multiplying Menace: The Revenge of Rumpelstiltskin by Pam Calvert

Follow Peter as he tries to stop Rumpelstiltskin and his multiplying stick.  Can he unlock the secret and rescue the kingdom from Rumpelstiltskin and his mischief?  A fun look at multiplication using familiar characters that kids are sure to love.

10. The Best of Times by Greg Tang

A fun take on the times table.  The author teaches innovative ways to derive solutions to multiplication problems without rote memorization.  The rhyming patterns are easy to remember and the cute illustrations are delightful.

(all photos and links via Amazon)

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Homework Station Inspiration: 32 Ideas for Organization and Order

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As the school year kicks into high gear, you’re bound to be inundated with homework, calendars, newsletters, flyers and all manner of miscellaneous supplies.  It can be hard to keep track of it all, especially while keeping schedules, activities, due dates and big days straight!  Keeping yourself and your kids on track all year long can see a monumental task: what you need is a homework station!  A homework station can be as simple or elaborate as you wish and should include all the items you and your kids need to stay focused on school.  If you’ve got the space, you can add hooks for backpacks, a calendar or a cork board so you never have to miss another important date!  Whatever your specific needs, there’s a station on this awesome list for you!  So take a look at our homework station inspiration and create a space that suits your family.

 

1. Desk Built-in with Hanging Storage from Better Homes and Gardens

This space is everything you could want in your home: clean lines, lots of storage, tucked into a little built-in.  If you’ve got the space for a built-in desk, you can’t beat it for homework management!

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2. Mini Homework Station in a Tray from House of Smiths

You can pick this tray up and take it with you!  Tucked inside the drawers and boxes are all the supplies your children could possibly need. This is perfect if you haven’t got a designated homework desk, or if your space is limited.  Plus, it’s motivational!

tipsaholic-mini-homework-station-in-tray-the-house-of-smiths

3. Rolling Cart Station from Smashed Peas and Carrots

The small kitchen cart from Ikea is cute, compact, and totally functional!  Cram it full of supplies for school and still have space left on the bottom to stack homework, worksheets, and books.  Then you can tuck it away and roll it out when you need it.

tipsaholic-rolling-cart-station-smashed-peas-and-carrots

4. Magnetic Back to School Station from The 36th Avenue

This magnetic back to school area can hang right on the side of your fridge!  You’ve got everything you need to stay organized right at arms length – including a handy dry erase/magnetic calendar, supplies, and “accountability clipboards.”

tipsaholic-magnetic-back-to-school-station-the-36th-avenue

5. Seat Sacks and Curtain Rod Storage from Scissors and Spatulas

If you’ve got a table or desk area, sew up some seat sacks to hang on the back of your chairs!  Kids can slip in all of their homework, books, and papers.  Add a curtain rod with hooks to store supplies they’ll need.

tipsaholic-seat-sacks-and-curtain-rod-storage-scissors-and-spatulas

6. Chalkboard Organization Station from Design Dining Diapers

This little chalkboard is a cute addition to a homework organization center!  The trendy baskets keep supplies within reach and you can write notes, reminders, and to-do’s on the chalkboard.  Get supplies and note clutter off the tables and counters and up on the wall.

tipsaholic-chalkboard-organization-station-design-dining-and-diapers

7. Tabletop Homework Station from Polka Dot Chair

This tabletop homework station can sit front and center on a desk or table and be removed during mealtimes since it’s so portable.  No need for a ton of space in order to keep everything looking crisp and neat – and readily available.

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8. Repurposed Crib from A Little Learning for Two

If you’ve got an old crib from your kid’s babyhood, repurpose it into a chalkboard desk!  The great part about it is that there’s a ton of built in space to hang supplies and needed items.  There’s room to spare on all the old crib slats and the desktop provides ample room to work.

tipsaholic-repurposed-crib-desk-a-little-learning-for-two

More great homework spaces on the next page — >

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De-Mystifying Math: 8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Math Education (Ages 9-11)

8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Math Education - Tipsaholic

 

Math.  It’s necessary, requires higher thought processes, and can be completely intimidating for elementary school-aged kids.  If you have the right approach, attitude and mindset as a parent, you can help your child gain not only an understanding and appreciation for math, but perhaps even a fondness.  In any case, supplementing your child’s education is crucial to help them feel at ease with abstract math concepts.  Here are 8 super helpful tips to help your 9-11 year old with math concepts and learning.

8 tips for de-mystifying math

1. Always consider the individual. 

All kids learn best in different ways — be it visually, orally, verbally, physically, etc.  You can find out more information about each different category at Learning Styles Online.  Keep your specific child in mind when considering your approach and remember to tailor their supplemental learning.  By this age, a “one size fits all” mentality towards education could hinder your child rather than help them.

Kids have started approaching schoolwork in a more individual way at this point in their development.  Worksheets (many which can be found online) might work best for a logical or solitary learner, while active games involving kinesthetics and math concepts would work better for a physical learner.

If you need some help identifying the best ways to teach your child, you can take a “multiple intelligences” quiz online and answer the questions as if you were your child.  The following quiz from Edutopia breaks down learning styles into percentages and offers specific information for each style: Multiple Intelligences Learning Styles Quiz.

Also keep in mind your child’s interests and try to fit their math education accordingly.  If they love cars, for instance, use games, activities and story problems involving cars.  If they love animals, use this as a theme for supplemental materials.

2. Do it together.

Chances are your child will be more appreciative of a unified learning approach, so do math together!  Sitting your child down at the computer to play games all by himself won’t have the same impact as learning together and discussing the concepts as you go.  So whatever the learning style, whatever the activity, be present.  If you find that you yourself are unfamiliar with a concept, look it up together and figure it out.  Oxford Owls Jargon Buster is a good place to start if you need help refreshing your memory about math terms.

3. Use a variety of tools, resources and methods.

Even if you’ve recognized your child’s preferred learning style, using the same method or activity repeatedly can cause boredom and disinterest — the exact opposite of our supplemental learning goals.  No matter how much your child loves timed tests or flashcards or dominoes, they’ll still appreciate a little variety.  Some ideas you can do with the whole family (even older or younger siblings), include: planning and budgeting for family outings, baking, planning a schedule, gardening, crafts that involve measuring and cutting shapes, weighing items, grocery shopping, charting growth with tables and graphs, online math games, video games, iPhone or iPad apps and board games.

4. Focus on key concepts appropriate for age and grade.   

Not sure what they are?  Email your child’s teacher and ask!  Talk with other teachers and parents you know.  Here’s a short list for kids ages 9-11 year-olds:  telling time (including adding and subtracting times), measurements (inches, yards, feet, miles, grams, pounds, etc. and converting between metric and imperial measurements), calculating with larger or more complex numbers (including up to three digits, decimals, percentages and fractions), understanding shapes (including 3-dimensional shapes and angles), and using different types of charts, tables and graphs.

5. Watch your own attitude. 

If you don’t approach supplemental education as a chore to be completed, neither will your kids!  Your attitude, more than anything else, shows them what their attitude should be.  Keep your comments, actions and reactions to math homework and any math activities you plan positive.  If your child doesn’t respond positively to a certain planned activity, take it in stride.  Don’t force it, but do come back to it later.  Say something like: “It’s ok.  We don’t have to do this now.  Would you rather help me cut out some shapes for a project I’m working on?” or something similar.  Wait a few days before trying again.  Whatever you do, don’t give up!  And don’t make it “work” but rather “math fun time” or “project time” — something your child can relate to and have desire to do.

6. Make it fun!  

It’ll be easier to accomplish tip number five if you’re focusing on making your supplemental activities fun for your child.  Play games.  Read fun math books.  Laugh while you learn.

7. Establish math as regular and routine.

How many times did you ask “When am I ever  going to use this in my life?” when you were in a math class?  Show your kids that math is a regular, everyday occurrence.  You can do this by not only having some type of supplemental activity every day (and it doesn’t have to be a long, drawn out activity – simple is better!), but also by pointing out instances when your child is using math skills when they may not even notice, such as when they are paying someone at the store and counting out money or when they are figuring out how many hours until bedtime.

8. Include the teacher.  

Whoever that might be — if they’re home-schooled, this is an easy one, just be sure to include your spouse!  Email the teacher for more information about what your child is learning.  Ask the teacher for extra worksheets or ideas for activities.  Use the teacher as a sounding board if you’re having issues approaching math with your child. He or she might have lots of ideas for engaging students that you haven’t thought of.  Your child’s teacher could also have access to or ideas about resources, books, websites, math nights, etc. that they can share with you.  If you’re a homeschooling parent, connect with other homeschooling parents for ideas.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Hands-On Literacy Activities (ages 3-6)

 

literacy activities 3-6

 

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Most preschool and kindergarten aged children are tactile, kinesthetic and visual learners.  Activities that engage these learning styles are the most effective way to supplement your child’s education at home.  Whether playing games, using flashcards, singing rhymes and songs or drawing pictures, using a variety of activities will engage your child so you keep their interest and have fun while learning.  Need some ideas for age and developmentally appropriate activities for your preschooler?  Here are  10 hands-on literacy activities for ages 3-6.

 

1. Online Games – Playing games on the computer has a general appeal for kids.  Using these resources teaches them technology skills, hand-eye coordination, gets their brain moving.  Check out these cool literacy building online games: Funbrain Reading and VocabThe Magic School Bus Gets An Earful Sound GameScholastic Building Language Game (Naming, Letters and Rhyming), pbs kids: Super Why Rhyme ‘n Roll Game

2. Board Games –  Board games can get the whole family involved!  Teach your kids valuable life lessons while learning about literacy – like taking turns, cooperation, being a good sport, supporting others, and social interactions/communication.  Try these board games: Alphabet Squiggle Game, Grandma’S Trunk Alphabet Game, ABC Cookies, Alphabet Memory, Spot It! AlphabetAlphabet Go Fish

3. Puzzles – Puzzles come in tons of variations, and get small motor skills going as well as improving cognitive skills.  Here are a few ideas:  Melissa & Doug Alphabet Letter Puzzles, Giant ABC & 123 Train Floor Puzzle, Spelling Puzzle Game, See & Spell

4. Flashcards - You can buy alphabet and phonics flashcards at many stores, even the dollar store.  Try Speakaboos online interactive alphabet flashcards.  OR, Course Hero is an awesome online source for creating your very own personalized flashcards!  It’s mainly used by older students as a study tool, but you can make them for your child and print them out or use them in conjunction with the free app.

5. Manipulatives – Manipulative are small items your kids can use in a ton of different ways to learn things from counting to upper and lowercase letters while developing fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination.  They usually come in fun, bright colors which are appealing to kids and teach preschoolers colors as well!  You can find manipulatives in lots of stores, and here are a few kits to try out: Alphabet Soup SortersAlpha Pops, Letter Construction SetABC Lacing Sweets

6. Colorful Catapult – Alter this catapult game from Spoonful by writing letters on plates instead of numbers.

7. Fly Swatter LettersDelia Creates shares really fun ideas for learning while playing outside.  In addition to the fly swatter game, she also shows how to play the letter game with squirt guns, how to write letters with a spray bottle, and how to play Number and Letter Twister!

8.  DIY Salt Tray – Check out This Mummas Life for directions on making this salt tray, a fun way for kids to trace letters and practice writing.

9. Letter Walk – This fun take on a scavenger hunt uses super simple, everyday items to teach kids letters and starting sounds, while getting them up and moving around!  Check it out on Learning and Playing in 2 Bedrooms or Less.

10. Flashlight Alphabet Game – If your kids are anything like mine, they’ll go nuts over this fun hide and seek game – played in the dark with the aid of an alphabet puzzle and a flashlight.  It’s super easy to set up – go get the details on Happily Ever After Mom.

 

Playing with kids is a great way for them to learn without even realizing it!  Are you looking for more fun learning activities for 3-6 year old kids? Try these 8 Hands-On Science Activities!

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterestBloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

De-Mystifying Math: 5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Math Education (Ages 6-9)

5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Math Education - Tipsaholic


Math can be a daunting subject, particularly when learning complicated concepts for the first time. Reinforcing math education at home is clearly important — whether your child is home-schooled, attends public or private school, goes to a charter school or does school online.  Helping your child develop good habits — not to mention a good attitude — toward math early on is key to success. Here are five tips to help your first through fourth grader get off on the right foot mathematically.

5 Tips fo De-Mystifying Math

1.  Always consider the individual:

Everyone learns in different ways.  Keep your specific child in mind when considering your approach and remember to tailor their supplemental learning.

Learning styles quizzes

If you need some help identifying the best ways to teach your child, you can take a “multiple intelligences” quiz online and answer the questions as if you were your child.  The following quiz from Edutopia breaks down learning styles into percentages and offers specific information for each style: Multiple Intelligences Learning Styles Quiz

2. Use all available resources:

In general, kids ages six to nine learn best visually.  There are so many different ways to make math appeal to your child. Technology is used in amazing ways in public schools, and you can take advantage of it too.

iPhone and iPad apps

Visual math 2 is a great option for first through third graders.  It uses pictures, sounds and lots of fun bonus activities that will make math more like a game.

Websites and blogs

Try the website Math is FUN.  There’s tons of information on different levels of math (i.e. geometry, algebra),  as well as different everyday math concepts (i.e. numbers, money, measurements).  Plus, there are puzzles, games, activities, and printable worksheets.  Do a search on Google and Pinterest and tons of blogs and websites will flood your search engine.

Books

There are tons of math workbooks or mind-teaser type books (like Math for All Seasons by Greg Tang) but there are also a ton of great picture books out there that can make math concepts easy to understand and much less frightening (like Spaghetti and Meatballs for All!  by Marilyn Burns).

3. Make it an everyday thing:

Practice number operations with household objects

Find things that come in groups and talk about how they can be grouped in different ways — for instance, a dozen eggs can be grouped in fours, in threes or in two groups of six.  Look for arrays (rows and columns) around the house, like floor tiles, a bookshelf with cubbies, or checkerboards. Have your child split them into smaller arrays — for instance a carton of eggs is an array of 2×6, but if you split it in half it’s two arrays of 2×3.

When you go to the store, have your child calculate how much you save by buying the cheaper of two brands of the same item.  Have him or her total as many items as possible on the receipt.  If your child likes sports, introduce them to statistics.

Find ways to collect, sort and organize information

Create a chart to track your child’s progress as they conquer math concepts.  Have them sort change into separate funds — tell them to put equal amounts of money in each fund but use different coins.

4. Make it a family thing:

Everyone can get in on the action

Make up story problems together.  Point out different opportunities to count, add, subtract or sort.  Play games together, such as board games, computer games, and riddles.  Get siblings in on the action!

5. Play:

Play lots of games

There are many different board games that use logic and strategic thinking: Monopoly, Chess, Checkers, and Clue are just a few examples.  Games that use flat manipulatives help develop deep logic as well as spatial reasoning – Tangrams, Logix, Blockus, or Shapes Up are all good options.

There are also a wide selection of video games that teach math:

  • For Nintendo DS: Junior Brain Trainer, Math Play, Challenge Me Math Workout, Brain Quest
  • For Nintendo Wii: Reader Rabbit, Smartypants, Think Smart
  • For a PC: Knowledge Adventure – Math Blaster

You can also find many free games online.  Playing lots of games as a family not only makes math tons of fun, but learning together reinforces the importance of math and gives your child confidence.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

7 Ways to Teach Kids in the Kitchen

7 Ways To Teach Kids in the Kitchen ~ Tipsaholic.com #kidsinthekitchen #parenting #teachingkidsathome

 

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Children are constantly looking for opportunities in which to expand their independence. Parents are constantly looking for ways to help their children grow and develop knew knowledge. If you’re wondering how to fill both of those needs, look no further than your own kitchen! There are many things you can do to make your kitchen friendly and inviting for kids. Bring your little chefs into the kitchen today and check out these 7 tips for encouraging new skills and independence while planning, preparing, and serving family meals.

 

1. Invite kids to help in meal planning and grocery shopping

Rather than just writing everything down yourself, why not involve the kids in the meal planning part of your month? Kids definitely have an opinion when it comes to the food they like to eat, and making compromises on your end – such as chicken nuggets and fries every other Wednesday – is apt to make them more likely to compromise when it comes to that green bean casserole you keep trying to get them to eat!

Sit down together and make a list of everyone’s favorite meals. Talk about the food groups and how each meal is best if it has lots of color and a variety of foods. Help them select foods from each group to make up each meal, then make your grocery list based on the meals you have created. Kids are great at helping find and retrieve shopping list items while in the grocery store too! Involve them in as many ways as you can.

 

2. Give them choices when it comes to snacks and lunches

Encourage kids to take the lead on their snacks and lunches by creating “stations” in your kitchen that set healthy boundaries while also allowing for individual choice. A basket full of healthy snacks in the pantry is a great option for when children come home hungry from school. Another idea worth considering is a “build-your-own-lunch” station. You can provide the sandwich fixings and lunchbox essentials, but allow the kids to choose and create a lunch all their own from those options.

 

3. Provide them with their own set of (safe) kitchen tools and an apron

What could be more fun than having your own set of tools when it’s time to help mom or dad in the kitchen? Kids will love having their own special utensils, bowls, and an apron. Try this fantastic set – it’s got everything those little hearts could desire.

 

4. Invite them to cook with you

There are many things children can help with when it comes to preparing food. Depending on a child’s age, mixing, pouring, cutting, and measuring are just a few of the skills that can be developed. If you need some ideas for age-appropriate tasks kids can complete in the kitchen, check out this infographic from Cooksmarts. If you want a few great ideas for simple foods you can make together, try these kid-friendly recipes.

 

5. Give them the reins for dinner once a month

Whether it’s macaroni and cheese from a box, peanut butter sandwiches, or something bold and adventurous, just go with it! The kids will love having the freedom to choose what, when, and how to get food on the table. If they ask for help or want to give you an assignment you can join in as “sous chef.” If they don’t seem to need you, be sure you still stick around to supervise and always follow safety rules for tools and appliances.

 

6. Consider growing a small garden

Showing kids where their food comes from and teaching them how to be part of the process is a great way to get them interested in new foods and trying new things. If you don’t have the room for a garden plot, growing herbs in old soup cans or keeping a tomato plant on the porch can bring just as many benefits. Not sure what to grow? Try a few of these ideas for plants you can grow indoors if you’re really stumped! Allow children to help plant, feed, and water your little garden, then show them the many ways you can use your homegrown “ingredients” in everyday family cooking!

 

7. Teach kids how to set the table and serve themselves

Every kid has seen the table set, but not every kid has learned to set it. Teach them the basics of table-setting etiquette – it will give them something to think about the next time they sit down to a nice meal! If you like, you can spend time making a simple table-setting placemat like these made from construction paper, or this one created from dollar store placemats.  And don’t be afraid to let children serve themselves in the right settings. There might be a few spills and plates piled high with Jell-O, but often children just need opportunities to show you what they’re capable of!

 

Did you enjoy learning ways to teach kids in the kitchen? Looking for more great ideas for kids? Try these tips for raising kids who love learning!

 

Featured image via Better Homes and Gardens.

 

Kayla Lilly is a photographer, writer, wife, and mama making a house a home in eastern Idaho. She met her mister while working at an amusement park and married him a year later after deciding there was no way to live without him. The amusement has continued as they’ve added three kids and a passel of pets to their lives while finishing college and starting a photography business. Drawing inspiration from the whirlwinds of marriage, parenthood, and the media, Kayla blogs at Utterly Inexperienced, and spends the rest of her time chasing chickens, organizing junk drawers, diapering toddlers, and photographing everyone willing to step in front of her lens.

 

10 Hands-On Math Activities for Ages 6-9

10 Hands-On Math Activities (for Ages 6-9) - Tipsaholic.com

 

As your child advances through elementary education, math concepts–even the basics–can become confusing, even frustrating to some.  At ages 6-9, kids are not only fine-tuning basic addition and subtraction and continuing with multiplication and division, they are also learning time, measurements, fractions and more.  It’s not merely important to supplement their math learning at this point in their education, it’s crucial.  Here are some excellent math activities from around the web for making math fun and exciting!

10 Hands-On Math Activities

Computer Games:

Math Lines – at different levels this teacher’s basic math equations, but in a cool, fun way.  You shoot a canon with a specific number ball at the number balls moving around the canon in a line, making sure the balls add up to the target number.

Lemonade Stand – helps teach number recognition, addition and counting money.  You create the lemonade based on reading a recipe, set up and manage your stand, and sell lemonade for a profit.  Come to think of it, you could just set up a real lemonade stand!

Fraction Beach – use your knowledge of fractions to build awesome sandcastles at the beach.

Do a Google search to find many more free computer games that are age appropriate for your child.  Try pbs.orgcoolmath.com or topmarks.

Active Games:

Chalk Clock – use the kids as the hands of the giant clock to work on telling time.

Skip Counting by Hand Outlines – hand outlines are perfect for teaching how to count by 5’s, plus they make for wonderful turkey-themed math activities around Thanksgiving time.

Water Balloon Number Target Practice – learn number recognition through play with water balloons and a chalk target board.

Props and Manipulative Ideas:

Golf Tee Math – use golf tees and play dough to work on creating and solving addition and subtraction equations

Addition Number Family Eggs – put leftover plastic Easter eggs to use by building numbers and solving equations

Coin Value File Folder Games – these file folder games are quick, easy, and cost nothing to make.

Free Printables:

Fraction Bars – practice fractions with these color-coded strips.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

8 Hands-On Science Activities (for 3-6 year olds)

8 Hands-On Science Activities for 3-6 Year Olds - tipsaholic, #scienceactivities, #scienceexperiments, #scienceforkids, #kids, #science

 

 

science title

 

Take the dreaded work out of learning science concepts!  Science doesn’t have to be dull and boring or difficult to grasp, even for young kids.  Cultivate a love for learning early on! Interested in teaching your kids all about science?  These 8 hands-on science activities are a great place to start.

 

1. Water Science Activities – The Measured Mom

Very young children will love these activities with water (they’d even be appropriate to do with toddlers)  Water play is great for tactile learners.  Not only will they learn about sinking vs. floating, repelling vs. absorbing, dissolution and various scientific properties/effects of water, they’ll also work on motor skills (large and small), develop critical thinking and learn to make hypothesis and test theories.  Plus, they’ll have a blast splashing around!

 

2. Bubble Science – Scholastic

Making your own bubbles can be a great learning experience in Science (and math too!)  The link has tons of great ideas for science-related topics to cover as you measure, pour and mix up your own solutions and then try them out in different ways!  Even babies love bubbles!  Another plus?  Your kids will get all their wiggles out chasing bubbles around the yard!

 

3. Bug Watch - kidspot

This old classic is still a hit with young kids!  Find instructions for creating your own bug sanctuary out of a plastic bottle… then let your little ones find some critters to place inside and watch for a while.  Check on the bugs at intervals and record findings.  Be sure to talk about their natural habitats and that bugs and insects (along with all animals) belong in the wild, then have a celebration for the grand release into the backyard!

 

4. Fossil Cookies – Martha Stewart

For help explaining paleontology and fossil records, make these awesome cookies with your kids!  The link includes a recipe and the full instructions for making fossil imprints.  When your done with the learning, your kids can have fun chowing down for snack time!

 

5. Borax Snowflakes – Delia Creates

Make your own sparkly, white crystals in the shape of snowflakes!  Delia Creates gives you the recipe for this super fun craft to do with your kids.  While you’re waiting for the crystals to form, you can explain why and how they do so.  Check out the science behind the craft here.

 

6. Carnation Colors – Spell Out Loud

Your kids can have a ton of fun making a rainbow of flowers!  All you need are plain white carnations, some jars, water and food coloring!  Place freshly cut flowers in the mix of water and food coloring and watch what happens!  Kids will love watching the transformation happen right before their eyes.  Have your kids guess what will happen to your flowers ahead of time and compare their findings to their hypotheses.  Have a discussion about how flowers and other plants “drink” in order to survive.

 

7. Balloon Blow – My Kids Guide

Did you know you can inflate a balloon using a water bottle and some simple household items – no breath needed?!  It’s true!  Show your little ones how to blow up a balloon the “normal way” before doing the experiment.  Then use a mixture of vinegar and baking soda in an empty water bottle, stretch the balloon around the opening and watch it expand!  No kid can resist the fun factor of balloons!

 

8. Primary Science Kit

Get started with some easy Science projects with this primary science kit!  The kit includes all the tools you’ll need for some groundbreaking experiments – tweezers, beaker, test tubes, flask, funnel, magnifying glass and more!  There are several sturdy activity cards included and an activity guide for parents.  The pieces are durable plastic, brightly colored and created with little hands in mind – making it not only appealing but perfectly designed for preschool kids.

 

For tons more science ideas and activities for little kids, check out the Activity Corner on Kid Spot.

 

If you want some ideas about hands-on Math activities for your preschooler, we’ve got you covered.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Find more fun for kids here:

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Pool Activities for Kids         Ice Activities for Kids            Hands on Math Activities