How to Create the Perfect Container Garden

Creating a container garden can be simple if you follow these tips for choosing the right plants and containers. Spruce up your home with a pot or two! How to Create the Perfect Container Garden ~ Tipsaholic.com #container #garden #gardening

How to Create the Perfect Potted Garden ~ Tipsaholic.com

The vision of a beautiful home often includes images of carefully potted plants and flowers. If you’d like to add to your home’s appeal by planting a few container gardens but are just not sure how, this gardening guide will put you on the right track. Spruce up your porch, patio, and other parts of your home using these tips for designing the perfect container garden.

 

The container itself

Different containers provide different benefits, so don’t just go for the pots with the most eye-catching patterns. The drainage and moisture needs of your plants should be a part of your decision when it comes to containers. You may need to punch some holes in the bottom of a pot if it needs more drainage or plug a few holes if you need less. Wood containers look nice but may be prone to rot. Hanging planters will need frequent watering. You can find more tips on containers here.

 

Know where your pots will live

If you’re filling a pot with sun-loving plants but plan to place it on your porch where there’s only shade, stop! Choose the right types of plants for the areas you want to fill. There are plants that love shade, plants that love sun, and plants that need a little of each. Plan ahead so you don’t end up with dead plants.

 

Choose plants that share growth needs

Sunlight, soil and moisture needs should be similar among the plants sharing a pot. Don’t mix plants that love the sun with plants that love the shade or desert cacti with water-lovers – you’re sure to be disappointed! Purchase the best kind of soil for the plants in each of your pots to get the best growth results.

 

Vary the sizes

Using variations of tall, medium, and small plants to fill all the visual space is one of the first rules in designing a container gardens. Another way to look at this rule is to make sure your pot includes one each of a vertically-growing plant, a horizontally-growing, and one that “cascades” over the sides of the container. Pay attention to what the plants are now versus the way they will be when they are fully grown.

 

Use contrasting plants

Use plants with contrasting colors and textures to give your container garden the most visual interest. A plant with smooth-edged leaves may be complimented by one with jagged edges. A plant with brightly colored blooms may look best next to a tall grass. You may want to buy all of the plants for a particular container at one time so that you can try out different combinations right there in your shopping cart.

 

Think about how the plants will change

The plants you choose may start small but will undoubtedly grow, taking up more space than you may have originally planned. Check the labels or ask nursery attendants for details about the different plants. Some plants may also develop blooms of various kinds and colors and you may need to take that into account if you have a particular color or texture scheme in mind. Also be aware of plants that may attract certain insects or birds — this may be something you want, or it may be something to avoid!

 

Take care in planting

Follow the planting and care instructions for each plant so that you have the best chances of keeping them all alive during the potting process. Moving plants from their original containers to new ones can be stressful for them and they may need some time to adjust before you put them outside, especially if the weather is not ideal. Do your best to care for the plants each day and your container gardens will be a pleasant and eye-catching addition to your home.

 

 

Kayla Lilly is a photographer, writer, wife, and mama making a house a home in eastern Idaho. She met her mister while working at an amusement park and married him a year later after deciding there was no way to live without him. The amusement has continued as they’ve added three kids and a passel of pets to their lives while finishing college and starting a photography business. Drawing inspiration from the whirlwinds of marriage, parenthood, and the media, Kayla blogs at Utterly Inexperienced, and spends the rest of her time chasing chickens, organizing junk drawers, diapering toddlers, and photographing everyone willing to step in front of her lens.

 

More Outdoor ideas:

5 Front Yard Landscaping Ideas via tipsaholic.com         slide         Outdoor Pallet Project Ideas

DIY Landscaping Ideas          Backyard Play Equipment       Outdoor Pallet Projects

16+ Handy Home Improvement and DIY Apps

16+ Home Improvement DIY Apps - Tipsaholic

tipsaholic title divider - diy apps

What kind of tools do you have in your toolbox? Does your collection include your smartphone? It should, since your phone can be turned into a wide array of useful tools with the help of these awesome DIY apps! For those of you who are interested in home improvement, carpentry, and other DIY projects, check out these DIY apps to see how they can make your life much easier.

Level Apps

If you’ve ever hung up a picture frame or a shelf, you know how important it is to have a good quality level in your toolbox. Make it easy to make sure everything in your home is not crooked by having a level app on your phone so you can whip it out of your pocket at any time.

Multi-Measures (iOS, Android) has both a surface level and a spirit/bubble level, but this DIY app also includes many other tools that you might find useful, such as a plumb bob, compass, and decibel.

iHandy Carpenter (iOS, Android) is similar to the previous app; it includes a level, surface level, plumb bob, and a few more tools. It’s nice-looking and pretty popular with DIYers. However, if all you need is a level, you can just download the iHandy Level Free (iOS, Android).

Measuring Apps

Home improvement includes lots of measurements, unless you like cabinets that don’t fit or furniture that’s too big for your space. A measuring tape always works, but why not use your phone instead so you don’t have to bring your tape to every store you go to?

Dimensions (iOS) is a great DIY app that measures many distances in your home and your yard and saves all of your measurements for you. You can measure your walls, your garden, and even tiny objects! The app also comes with several other features.

There are so many measuring apps that it’s impossible to mention them all, but some notables are Smart Measure Pro (Android), Dot Measure Pro (iOS), and Easy Measure (iOS, Android).

If you need to send over a whole list of measurements to your carpenter or your interior designer, or if you’re shopping for furniture and need to bring a lot of measurements of your home with you to find the perfect fit, you can save all of your measurements and put them around your pictures. You’ll be able to do this with the Photo Measures Lite (iOS, Android) app.

Painting Apps

You’re probably doing (or planning on doing) a lot of painting if you’re a serious DIYer or even just a homeowner. A good painting app will make this task a lot easier to plan for and complete.

Several paint companies have their own apps, but a well-liked one is ColorSmart by BEHR (iOS, Android). You can perform color-matching with your phone, as well as finding paint color schemes and testing out your paint colors in various photos of rooms and styles in the app.

Prefer to test out paint colors of actual photos of your rooms? Get the Paint My Place App (iOS) and do just that. It uses several paint brands so you can choose your favorite one. Change the paint colors of a room or the exterior of your home and narrow down your selections before heading over to the paint store.

If you just need to know how much paint you need to complete your project, the Paint Calculator Pro (iOS, Android) will help you find out. The app also will inform you how much your painting project will cost you and quotes from pros if you’re considering hiring help instead of doing it yourself.

Gardening Apps

Have a garden or a yard you’d like to add a garden to? Or maybe you just need help with increasing your curb appeal with landscaping? Check out these gardening apps and see how your phone can make your outdoor space more beautiful and functional.

Garden Plan Pro (iOS) is an all-comprehensive app that will help you design your garden, know when to plan certain corps, know where to plant your seeds depending on sun/shade, and set reminders that help you maintain your garden throughout the year.

The Garden Compass Plant/Disease Identifier (iOS) app is great for beginning gardeners and landscapers. You can use the app to identify plants that are already around your home by taking a picture of them. It also identifies diseases and pests.

New to gardening? The When to Plant (iOS) app will tell you exactly when to plant whatever you want to grow. You’ll put in your zip code and get all the information you need to begin gardening. For those of you who don’t have an iPhone or iPad, you can also download this app onto your laptop or computer.

Carpentry Apps

Whether you like to make or refinish furniture, you’ll benefit from adding a few carpentry apps to your smartphone.

Woodcraft (iOS) is a handy DIY app to have if you like to build. It develops 3D models of your creations and helps you come up with a list of measurements of wood to buy so nothing gets wasted. This app will be very useful whether you’re looking to build simple shelves to fit a weird space in your garage or to adjust measurements on a DIY furniture plan to better fit your home.

I.D. Wood (iOS) helps you identify the various types of wood so you can select the best type for your project. If you’re refinishing an existing piece of furniture, you can use the app to find out what wood it is and how to best refinish it.

This list only barely scratches the surface of the world of DIY apps. There are sewing apps, floor plan apps, decor and furniture shopping apps, and even garage sale and flea market apps! Whip out your smartphone and find out just how useful it can be. And who knows what our phones can do for us in the future, even just a year from now.

What other DIY apps do you love? This list needs more android-compatible apps, so feel free to add your favorite DIY apps in the comments!

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

More DIY Inspiration:

9 fun winter projects with a purpose at tipsaholic.com 10 Festive DIY Christmas Tree Skirts - Tipsaholic 25 Clever Storage Ideas - Tipsaholic
Winter Projects Tree Skirts Storage Ideas

 

What to Plant in October

Get creative in the garden this fall. Check out what you can plant in your garden in October via @tipsaholic #gardening #october #plants What to Plant in October -tipsaholic.com

The fall season isn’t exactly known for gardening, but you can actually plant some vegetables in your garden during the month of October. Depending on where you live, you can sow or plant certain vegetables for a winter or early spring harvest. So don’t hang up your gardening gloves just yet; here’s what to plant in October!

Garlic

If you love to add garlic to your food, you’ll love the taste of fresh garlic that you grew yourself. Plant garlic in October and it’ll start coming up in the early spring. Harvest your delicious garlic in June or July. Here’s some more information on how to grow and harvest garlic.

Broccoli

Broccoli actually tastes better when it’s grown in cold weather. If your area has really cold winters, you can cover your garden with cloth. Plant broccoli in October if you live in a warmer climate. Find more information on growing broccoli here.

Spinach

Live in a colder region? Try sowing spinach seeds in October and use fleece covers or winter lights during especially cold winter days and nights. The power vegetable will be ready to harvest in spring. Some really great information on growing spinach can be found here.

Kale

Kale is another power vegetable that will be a nice addition to your garden. Depending on where you live, kale should be planted between July and October. If you live in the south, October is a great time to plant kale. You want your kale to mature in cold weather for best results. Learn more about planting kale here.

Carrots

In the deep south, extremely hot summers mean that carrots don’t grow well during their usual growing season. Thus, October is a better time to plant carrots for a late winter harvest. Get some great tips on growing carrots here.

Since the growing seasons of vegetables and other plants can vary so much from region to region, the best way to figure out what to plant in October in your garden is to use this great website tool. Plug in your zip code and you’ll get a nice chart with a variety of fruits and vegetables and which months to plant them in your garden. Best of all: it’s free!

Other than planting vegetables in your garden, here’s what you should be doing in your garden in October. Find your region and complete the checklist for a well-maintained garden.

What are you planning on planting in your garden this month?

For more gardening tips, check out 10 Edible Plants to Grow Indoors and Tips for Winterizing Your Summer Garden.

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

Check out these other great ideas:

herbs1         edible plants          Tips for Winterizing Your Summer Garden via Tipsaholic

Herb Garden Ideas             Indoor Edible Plants             Winterizing your Garden

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas

25 Indoor herb garden ideas @tipsaholic, #herbs #gardening


fantastic indoor herb gardens

Whether you’re an apartment dweller with urban garden needs, a cook who likes to have fresh herbs right at your fingertips, or you’re simply looking for an easy way to begin growing your own herbs, indoor gardening is a great solution!  Greenery is important to your home for decor and air quality, plus herbs have the added benefit of being edible.  Herbs are great for beginner gardeners since they are easily managed and require little space, but even an old pro will love the fantastic indoor herb garden ideas we’ve rounded up.  No matter what your experience level or needs are, this is your go-to list for growing herb gardens inside.

1. Reclaimed Wood Mason Jar Garden – Not Just a Housewife

This is an easy and quick project that makes use of old wood and mason jars.  All you need is a bit of wall space to hang these on!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

2. Over-the-Sink Hanging Pots – Coordinately Yours

Nothing could be easier than simply placing some well-positioned pots!  Use inexpensive pots, paint them up, and drill a hole for hanging on a hook!  No extra wood needed, no wall space used.  Perfect space-saver!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

3. Upside-Down Herb Garden in Bottles – Behance.net

It’s hard to believe that these chic, modern bottles are actually painted water bottles!  Strung upside down and hanging from copper pipe, this is the perfect balance between form and function.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

4. Countertop Tin Can Herb Garden – HGTV

If you’ve got a vacant spot on your counter, you can make this adorable tin can garden!  Keep your cans together and allow for drainage in a circular pan or tray.  It’s easy and enviro-friendly!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

5. Upcycled Canister Window Herb Garden – Crafty Kitchen Witchery

Use your recyclables to create this upside down herb garden!  These simple throw-away canisters are transformed with pretty paper.  With some easy to follow tricks, you can create dangling planters to place right in front of your kitchen window.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

6. Hanging Basket Herb Garden – The Telegraph

Those tiered hanging baskets aren’t just for fruit!  You can create a whole garden in one three-basket unit.  Just hang within easy reach from the ceiling by any window in the house and you’re golden.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

7. Hanging Bottle Top Herb Garden – Home DZine

Here’s another idea for using recyclables.  If you’ve got lots of plastic bottles around, all you need are the tops and you can create this fun hanging herb garden.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

8. Wood and Chalkboard Herb Garden Jars – Camille Styles

With some reclaimed wood, some mason jars and a little chalkboard paint, this small, wall-mounted garden is a clever mix of trendy, shabby and useful!  It’s a fast project that requires little space and looks great.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

9. Vintage Tea Caddy Herb Garden – Apartment Therapy

Go treasure hunting at your local thrift shop for some vintage tins.  These tea caddies make an awesome display for herbs when set in the window sill.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

10. Tabletop Herb Garden – Bell and Star

It’s not difficult to fit all the herbs you regularly use in one bowl or basket.  Then just place it on your counter, or even better, on your table as a clever centerpiece.  It’s convenient and efficient!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

11. Pallet Frame Herb Garden – The Kitchen

This pallet frame is the perfect spot to plant some herbs right on the kitchen wall.  An added bonus?  The extra ledge space in the frames is perfect for some eye-catching bottles, jars, canisters or other kitchen paraphernalia that can double as decor.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

12. Vintage Box Herb Planter – Design Sponge

If you notice any interesting wooden boxes, with or without lids at flea markets and thrift stores, scoop them up because we’ve found a use for them!  With some minor tweaks you can turn them into herb planters in no time at all.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

13. Window Ledge Herb Box – A Beat That My Heart Skipped

If there aren’t any vintage boxes to be found, never fear.  Any plain wood framed box can be transformed with a bit of paint and creativity.  Just place your new box on the window ledge for a very pretty and useful planter.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

14.  Herb Mason Jar Shelf – Food, Family and Finds

A wooden shelf with holes for mason jars can easily become an herb shelf.  Can’t find a specific shelf dedicated to housing jars?  Use any normal wooden shelf and drill large holes yourself.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

15. IKEA Wine Rack Herb Garden Hack – Curbly

This hanging herb garden was once a wine rack!  It’s incredible what you can make with a few simple and quick adjustments.  With large glasses, some paint and some herbs, your wall will look very stylish and delicious.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

16. Window Bucket Herb Garden – 3 Peppers

Some curtain rods and a few paint buckets with handles can easily house your herbs in front of a sunny window.  This idea is simple and versatile as you could have any number of variations with styling and colors.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

17. Shoe Caddy Turned Herb Garden – Birds and Blooms

A cloth shoe caddy is a perfect space-saving solution, and not just for shoes!  Hung near natural light, all you need is a bit of soil and some herbs to turn an organizer into a garden.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

18. Herb Tower – DIY Enthusiasts

This whimsical pot tower is a mini version of the outdoor variety.  It tucks perfectly into a window sill and can hold several different herbs within the tiers.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

19. IKEA Pots Window Herb Garden – Urban Gardens

IKEA hanging pots are probably the most used home decor/DIY item there is.  You can use them for nearly everything, from holding craft supplies, to organizing small toys, and now for herbs!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

20. Modern Hanging Herb Garden – Tried and True

No need to buy a special rack or frame to house your herb garden pots – just use what you have on hand!  These modern and simple wooden frames were once a room divider that was never used.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

21. Chalkboard Pot Herb Garden – Robin’s Nest

An indoor garden can be as easy as adding chalkboard paint to your clay pots!  Just write the name of the herb and place on the window sill or counter and you’ve got instant decor and edible greens.  Add some twine or ribbon for some more detail.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

22. Herb Garden Drawers – The Garden Glove

Another reason to scout out your flea markets and thrift stores!  Score an old shelving unit like this one and you’ve got an interesting, clever and beautiful herb garden display.  Depending on the condition of the piece, you can simply add your herbs while still in pots, or go all out and make them into planter boxes like the ones mentioned earlier.  Either way, it’s perfect for any table, counter or shelf!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

23. Woodland Herb Garden – Garden Therapy

These homey and natural plaques are a perfect backdrop for herb jars.  Add hooks to sections of log, then hang your jars.  Mount them on the wall or even on the side of the cupboard over your sink!

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

24. Mini Hanging Herb Garden – Better Homes & Gardens

Take that normal, boring hanging basket and make something fun, unique and yummy!  Grow your herbs in a basket hung sideways from the wall.  It’s not difficult to create, and takes up just a bit of wall space.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

25. Hanging Herb Garden Jars – bugaboo, mini, mr & me

With metal chains and hooks, you can hang your herb mason jar garden from nearly any wooden backdrop.  The ombre chevron is painted on a simple raw wood board, and the whole garden is then hung from the same type of chain.  You can hang the jars sideways or straight on.

25 Fantastic Indoor Herb Garden Ideas - Tipsaholic.com #herbs #garden

If you liked these, you’ll love the edible garden ideas from this post at Remodelaholic!   If you’re looking for more container ideas, check out these indoor and outdoor planters.  And don’t miss the creative genius behind these creative container gardens!

featured image via Better Homes and Gardens

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Edible Plants To Grow Indoors

edible plants

 

 

edible plants to grow indoors

If you’ve got a green thumb but don’t have a lot of outdoor space, you may think gardening is a pipe dream.  But think again!  There’s more you can do with your indoor space than potted plants and succulents!  If you like to eat your efforts, this list of edible plants you can grow indoors is for you.  It may take a little more creativity, engineering and planning, but indoor gardening is great for those who live in apartments, condos or have regulations on outdoor gardens in their area.  These 10 plants are commonly grown outside, but can easily be translated into indoor plants with a few alterations and accommodations.

 

1. Avocados

Avocado_604_0

It’s true that you can grow an avocado plant simply using a pit, but this type will likely yield no edible fruit.  Instead, plant a dwarf avocado tree in a large pot with sand in the bottom.  Remember to allow for drainage and water regularly, but never make it soggy.  You’ll need tall ceilings for this type of tree – even dwarf trees can grow to 10 feet.

 

2. Carrots

Carrots require a bit of room, but aren’t particularly finicky to grow.  Start with a window box or pot that’s a foot and a half in length.  After you plant your seeds, keep the soil watered but not soaked.  The seeds should germinate within 2 weeks.

 

3. Tomatoes

If you want to try your hand at indoor tomatoes, all you need is a 6 inch pot (for one plant).  Start with a starter mix of soil and plant your seeds, keeping the soil well-watered but never soggy.  Once the plants start to germinate, transplant them into potting soil.  As your plant gets bigger, you may need to stage it to prevent the stem from breaking.  Tomatoes like sunshine, but not intense heat so pay attention after placing them near windows.

 

4. Mushrooms

Mushrooms can be purchased to grow indoors as a kit, like this one.  You can also use a laundry basket, as with the method shown here.  Basically, you inoculate straw with mushroom spores and stuff them in the laundry basket.  The basket is usually kept in a box or bag until completely colonized.  Mushrooms prefer shade, so it’s not necessary to keep them in a window or sunny spot!

 

5. Green Onions

These are possibly the easiest vegetable to grow indoors.  Simply place the bottom of leftover purchased green onions in an inch of water in a glass.  Place them in a window and allow the shoots to grow for about a week. (be sure to change the water daily!) When they’ve doubled in size, plant them in a small pot.

 

6. Peppers1280518.large

Peppers enjoy warmth and sun, so if you’ve got a nice warm spot by a window, many types of peppers will thrive.  Banana or cherry peppers do well indoors.  Be aware that peppers do like room, so use a pot that’s at least 3-5 gallons.  For ease, try starting from a sprout instead of using seeds.

 

7. Radishes

Radishes are easy to grow whether inside or out, which makes them perfect for a beginner gardener.  They like it warm, so place the container near a window, but move them on particularly hot days.  The best part about radishes is that they’re ripe and mature in only a few weeks!

 

8. Salad GreensLettuce_604

Salad greens are easy to grow in small spaces, beginning either with seeds or “starts”.  Use a planter box that allows for drainage.  Plant your seeds or starts about 4 inches apart, and if using starts, be sure to massage the roots before planting.  Keep the soil continually moist, but don’t overwater.

 

9. Lemons

Lemons grow best in very sunny spaces – with at least 12 hours of sun per day.  If you start with a dwarf tree, you’ll likely be able to harvest fruit the first year.  Plant the tree in a pot that’s slightly larger than the root ball of your tree in soil specifically formulated for citrus trees and water it daily – though be sure not to oversaturate.

 

10. Mandarin Oranges

It’s best to start mandarin oranges as a dwarf tree.  They grow well in spacious pots with very rich soil and lots of drainage.  Place them in very sunny locations and rotate them regularly as you water them to ensure equal sun exposure all over.  The root system will likely grow abundantly, and when the begin to poke through the drainage holes you’ll need to transplant the tree in a container at least 2 inches larger in diameter.

 

If you want a more complete overview of these plants and more, you can read this post on greatist.  More information can also be found here on care2.  See a much more complete list of plants, herbs and tree you can grow indoors on howstuffworks.

Looking for more? Check out these 25 edible garden ideas on Remodelaholic!

 

Featured image via care2

Title image via Better Homes and Gardens

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

30 Sweet and Simple Succulent DIY’s

30 Succulent Ideas

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Succulent gardens are not only space savers, they're easy to maintain and look great!  In planters, vertical beds, upcycled containers, mini gardens, terrariums or any number of other spaces, succulents create unique and charming decor.  Get some ideas from our gallery of 30 sweet and succulent DIY's.

tipsaholic - 30 sweet ant dimple succulent diy'sSpringtime means warmer weather, more sunshine and sprouting plants! It’s time to get your gardens in order. Don’t have a green thumb? Never fear! Succulents are the perfect plant for unseasoned and master gardeners alike. They don’t take up a lot of space, require only a little soil, and are difficult to kill. They come in a huge assortment of sizes, shapes and colors. They can thrive in lots of different environments, and love full sun.

If you’re looking for something low maintenance and beautiful, succulents are the plant for you. Not sure what to do with your succulents? Use our gallery of 30 sweet and simple succulent DIY’s as a guide to getting started!  These creative projects are perfect for welcoming Spring.

Planters:

Vertical Gardens:

Miniatures:

Terrariums:

Odds and Ends:

30 Sweet and Simple Succulent DIY's - Tipsaholic.com #gardening

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

What to Plant in May

What to Plant in May | Tipsaholic.com #gardening #vegetables #planting #food #healthy

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They say that you reap what you sow. Well, it’s May and it’s time to sow the seeds for a harvest to reap come summer! Here’s what to plant in your garden during the month of May. Since weather conditions may vary depending on where you live, this list of what to plant in May should apply to you if it’s consistently in the 50s during nights.

 

1. Cucumber

Cool down in the summer with cold cucumber dishes by planting cucumber seeds in your garden now! Cucumbers grow very fast; you should expect to see cucumbers show up in your garden within two weeks of planting. If you have a small garden, cucumbers will be a perfect fit since they can climb. Find an area in your garden that receives full sun and you’ll be enjoying cucumber salads (and cucumber facials) before you know it!

Here is some more information on growing cucumbers and learn how to prevent them from tasting bitter.

 

2. Cantaloupe

This sweet fruit is popular with kids and can be turned into a delicious cantaloupe milkshake! It’s important to ensure that your soil is warmer than 65 degrees before planting cantaloupe seeds, so if you live in a cooler climate you can cover the soil with black plastic for a few weeks to heat it up. Then cut out small holes and plant the seeds without removing the black plastic. Grow vines in raised rows for best results, but you can grow them on a trellis if you’re limited on space.

For more tips and tricks on growing cantaloupes, read this guide on growing cantaloupes.

 

3. Zucchini

The question of what to plant in May is often answered with the beloved zucchini. Your neighbors will love you if you plant zucchini in your garden. With proper care, you’re sure to get a bumper crop and end up giving some of your crop to others! At least, you’ll never run out of this vegetable all summer after you plant it in your garden this month. Zucchini, or yellow squash, should be planted in warm soil; use the black plastic method mentioned above when planting zucchini in May if needed. Grow zucchini in full sun and be sure to frequently water the seeds.

For more detailed information on planting summer squash in your garden, here’s a great guide.

 

4. Beet

If you salivate over the thought of a beet and goat cheese sandwich, plant beets in your garden in May. Soil that is at least 50 degrees is warm enough for beet seeds to grow. Beets are a long-season crop and you’ll be enjoying the red root vegetable until well into fall. If you live in an area where it’s dry and doesn’t rain very much, soak the beet seeds for one full day before you plant them. Then enjoy that beet sandwich!

You’ll find more helpful information on planting beets here.

 

Now that you know what to plant in May, what are you planning on growing in your garden this month? I’m leaning towards zucchini…

For more gardening tips, check out How To Grow Vegetables From Scraps and Tips for Winterizing Your Summer Garden.

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

 

Featured image courtesy of Better Homes and Gardens.

 

5 Tips for Arranging Flowers From the Garden

5 Tips for Arranging Flowers from the Garden @Tipsaholic


5 tips for arranging garden flowers via Tipsaholic

Starting months ago, you planned your garden, planted it, and helped everything grow. After that hard work, you are rewarded with beautiful plants and flowers in your own yard. Now you are only need to take a few steps out your door to find flowers perfect for making centerpieces, bouquets and other indoor arrangements. Here are five tips for arranging flowers from the garden.

Plan Ahead

When creating your garden, be sure to select annuals and perennials that are good for cuttings. A few examples of flowers, perfect for using in arrangements, are marigolds, gladiolus, iris, peony, black-eyed susan, and, of course, roses. Also plant enough blooms to maintain a good amount outdoors after a few are harvested for the indoors.

Select Interesting Containers

Since these are flowers from your garden, think beyond a vase when picking what type of container to display the arrangements. A glass jar, bucket, or pitcher can be good choices. Even a boot or box could be selected. Just add a smaller clear glass vase inside to hold the flowers and protect the item from any water damage.

Create Color Combinations and Texture

Picking the right flower combination can give you the look you are after. Using all one type of flower in an arrangement can look very classy; or select different flowers of all the same color for a monochromatic look. Consider adding a pop of color with a few blooms in a contrasting color to add interest to a bouquet. Be sure to select flowers that are growing at different stages, even including a few buds.  Also, include non-floral items like branches or leaves for added texture.

Vary the Heights

Before placing the flowers in your container, remove from the stem any foliage that will be below the water line. Then cut the steams so they are at varying heights, placing the tallest blossom in the bouquet towards the middle, and working your way out with the shortest at the edge of the container. A few blooms can even hang over the edge.

Enjoy the Process

Remember this is something fun and creative and not an exact science. Don’t be afraid to play around with different foliage, flowers and vases when creating an arrangement of flowers from the garden.

 

Photo source: Better Homes and Gardens

 

I’m Frances. I am a mother, a wife, and a community volunteer. I work as a scientist by day and moonlight as a blogger. Making lists helps me keep everything on track. While I have a good life, there is always room for improvement. Join me as I decorate, organize, and try new things over at my blog Improvement List.

How To Grow Vegetables From Scraps

How To Regrow Vegetables From Scraps via Tipsaholic.com


Wait! Don’t throw away that stalk of celery or the white bulbs of that bunch of scallions. Did you know that you can re-grow vegetables, right in your kitchen so you’ll always have some of the most popular veggies we use in our daily cooking? Best of all, you don’t need a green thumb, a garden or even warm, sunny weather to do it! (featured image via Remodelaholic)
 

6 Vegetables That Can Grow From Scraps via Tipsaholic

Green Onions

Since most recipes call for only the green part of green onion (also called scallions or spring onions), we often wind up wasting the white bulbs. But those bulbs are the heart and soul of the onion plant! When you’ve finished with the green tops, put the bunch of white bulbs into a glass of water and leave it on your windowsill. In just a few days, you’ll be begin to see new green onions springing up! Harvest them as you need them, but be sure to change the water every few days.

 

Leeks

You know how leeks look a lot like great big green onions? They can be regrown the same way as green onions, too! Follow the same bulbs-in-a-glass-of-water routine the next time you have a leek or two leftover and you’ll wind up with your own supply for months to come.

 

Celery and Fennel

These two veggies are also candidates for the water trick. When you buy a bunch of celery or fennel, simply cut off the base and put it, stalk tips facing up, into a bowl of water (just enough to cover the bottom of the bunch, not the whole thing). For these two, however, go ahead and keep them out of direct sunlight.

 

Garlic

Have you ever opened your pantry and found a forgotten bunch of garlic with green sprouts on the ends? Next time, don’t throw it away: regrow it! Plant the garlic in a small pot just as you would flower bulbs in the fall: sprouted tip facing up. You’ll end up with a great houseplant and some fresh garlic for the kitchen.

 

Ginger

Cut off a small piece of the ginger root you bought at the grocery store, plant it in a pot and wait for it to sprout. When you need ginger, you can dig up the whole plant, cut off whatever you need from the root and then repot the plant.

 

Romaine Lettuce

You can regrow many types of lettuce, but stem-based romaine is the easiest. Just as you did with the celery, cut the base of the lettuce head off and put it in a bowl of water to regrow. You’ll be amazed how quickly a new head sprouts up!

 

Julianne Puckett is the creator of Yankee Kitchen Ninja, a blog about what she calls “stealthy homemaking” — healthy recipes that are quick and easy to prepare, DIY gardening tips and the occasional craft project. A designer, writer and former suburban-dwelling IT professional, she lives in rural Vermont, where she struggles to balance the siren call of her inner farmer with her love of cute shoes and cocktails.

Tips for Winterizing Your Summer Garden

Tips for Winterizing Your Summer Garden via Tipsaholic.com

Even with apple picking and back-to-school on your mind this fall, don’t forget to put your summer garden to bed for the winter! If you put forth just a little extra effort in winterizing this fall, you’ll be rewarded with great time savings and a garden that’s ready to go in the spring when it’s time to tackle planning and planting the garden again. (featured image via Remodelaholic)

4 Tips for Winterizing Your Garden via Tipsaholic.com

Pull Out Dead Plants

I know what you’re thinking: “But they’re dead! I can just let them rot over the winter!” Yes, you can, but that also means that any spores left from diseases or blights or eggs of obstinate bugs will be allowed to live in your garden over the winter. They are pretty hearty little buggers and might just rear their ugly heads again next summer. Pull out and dispose of all the dead plants in your garden to start with a clean, healthy slate in the spring.

 

Keep Weeding

Nearly the same principle applies to weeds as it did above to disease spores. If you pull out the weeds now, you’ll have fewer of them re-growing in the spring, which you’ll have to pull out anyway. Bonus: pulling older weeds now is much easier than pulling newer, stronger ones next year!

 

Rake Out the Old Mulch

Unless you mulch only with compost or newspaper, which can be tilled back into the soil in the spring, rake out all your hay or bark mulch. If it is allowed to become incorporated into the garden, it can significantly change the pH of your soil; that can affect how well your plants will grow – if at all. If you’re feeling very ambitious, go ahead and add a layer of compost or mulched leaves for the winter, too, which will add some extra nutrients next spring when you till them into the soil.

 

Tidy Up Your Tools

Just as you wash your pots and pans when you’re finished cooking, so too should you clean up your gardening implements to ready them for next year. If you have any outdoor pots or containers, empty them, hose them out and store them out of the weather so they won’t crack or break. Also, give all your hand tools a quick scrub in some soapy water, hose them off and let them dry; you can even coat metal tools with a think layer of vegetable oil to prevent them from rusting over the winter.

 

Julianne Puckett is the creator of Yankee Kitchen Ninja, a blog about what she calls “stealthy homemaking” — healthy recipes that are quick and easy to prepare, DIY gardening tips and the occasional craft project. A designer, writer and former suburban-dwelling IT professional, she lives in rural Vermont, where she struggles to balance the siren call of her inner farmer with her love of cute shoes and cocktails.