10 Hands-On Literacy Activities (ages 3-6)

 

literacy activities 3-6

 

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Most preschool and kindergarten aged children are tactile, kinesthetic and visual learners.  Activities that engage these learning styles are the most effective way to supplement your child’s education at home.  Whether playing games, using flashcards, singing rhymes and songs or drawing pictures, using a variety of activities will engage your child so you keep their interest and have fun while learning.  Need some ideas for age and developmentally appropriate activities for your preschooler?  Here are  10 hands-on literacy activities for ages 3-6.

 

1. Online Games – Playing games on the computer has a general appeal for kids.  Using these resources teaches them technology skills, hand-eye coordination, gets their brain moving.  Check out these cool literacy building online games: Funbrain Reading and VocabThe Magic School Bus Gets An Earful Sound GameScholastic Building Language Game (Naming, Letters and Rhyming), pbs kids: Super Why Rhyme ‘n Roll Game

2. Board Games –  Board games can get the whole family involved!  Teach your kids valuable life lessons while learning about literacy – like taking turns, cooperation, being a good sport, supporting others, and social interactions/communication.  Try these board games: Alphabet Squiggle Game, Grandma’S Trunk Alphabet Game, ABC Cookies, Alphabet Memory, Spot It! AlphabetAlphabet Go Fish

3. Puzzles – Puzzles come in tons of variations, and get small motor skills going as well as improving cognitive skills.  Here are a few ideas:  Melissa & Doug Alphabet Letter Puzzles, Giant ABC & 123 Train Floor Puzzle, Spelling Puzzle Game, See & Spell

4. Flashcards – You can buy alphabet and phonics flashcards at many stores, even the dollar store.  Try Speakaboos online interactive alphabet flashcards.  OR, Course Hero is an awesome online source for creating your very own personalized flashcards!  It’s mainly used by older students as a study tool, but you can make them for your child and print them out or use them in conjunction with the free app.

5. Manipulatives – Manipulative are small items your kids can use in a ton of different ways to learn things from counting to upper and lowercase letters while developing fine motor skills and hand-eye coordination.  They usually come in fun, bright colors which are appealing to kids and teach preschoolers colors as well!  You can find manipulatives in lots of stores, and here are a few kits to try out: Alphabet Soup SortersAlpha Pops, Letter Construction SetABC Lacing Sweets

6. Colorful Catapult – Alter this catapult game from Spoonful by writing letters on plates instead of numbers.

7. Fly Swatter LettersDelia Creates shares really fun ideas for learning while playing outside.  In addition to the fly swatter game, she also shows how to play the letter game with squirt guns, how to write letters with a spray bottle, and how to play Number and Letter Twister!

8.  DIY Salt Tray – Check out This Mummas Life for directions on making this salt tray, a fun way for kids to trace letters and practice writing.

9. Letter Walk – This fun take on a scavenger hunt uses super simple, everyday items to teach kids letters and starting sounds, while getting them up and moving around!  Check it out on Learning and Playing in 2 Bedrooms or Less.

10. Flashlight Alphabet Game – If your kids are anything like mine, they’ll go nuts over this fun hide and seek game – played in the dark with the aid of an alphabet puzzle and a flashlight.  It’s super easy to set up – go get the details on Happily Ever After Mom.

 

Playing with kids is a great way for them to learn without even realizing it!  Are you looking for more fun learning activities for 3-6 year old kids? Try these 8 Hands-On Science Activities!

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterestBloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Hands-On Literacy Activities (ages 6-9)

10 hands on literacy activities for ages 6-9 ~ Tipsaholic.com #literacy #games #kids

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No matter how old your child is or what type of schooling he or she receives, supplementing literacy education at home is super important.  If you want your child to be a life-long learner, enjoy reading and get the most out of their language and literacy education, you need to be an active participant in teaching them.  It certainly doesn’t have to be a chore and should feel like fun to both you and your child!  If you’re not sure where to start, here are ideas for 10 hands-on literacy activities for ages 6-9.

 

1. Board Games

From ages 6-9, kids are more interested in structured games with specific rules and have better attention spans and strategizing skills.  Capitalize on these developments when you plan learning activities for your child!  Here are some board games that focus specifically on language acquisition skills: Silly Sentences, What’s Gnu?, Pop For Sight Words, Tell Tale, Brain Quest.

 

2. Flash Cards 

While flash cards aren’t ideal teaching tools for every child, they’re an excellent way to switch up activities, take along when traveling or waiting for appointments, or for solo play time.  The good news is that flash cards don’t have to be boring!  Here are several sets that are sure to spark interest in kids: Spelling Flashcards, My Favorite Things Flash Cards, Alphabet Animals Flash Cards, Alphabeasties, Rhyming Words Flash Kids Flash Cards.  There are also some great DIY flash card tutorials: Tactile Sight Word Cards, Free Alphabet Flash Cards, Wooden Alphabet Cards.

 

3. Storytelling Bag

Put many different small objects/toys/cutouts in a bag.  Sit in a circle and begin your story with “Once upon a time…”.  Take turns drawing an item from the bag without looking and fitting it into the story.  Pass the bag around the circle to continue the story until you run out of items.

 

4. Word Family Portraits

A word family is a group of words that share a common combination of letters and sounds.  This game is an example of successfully scaffolding and building from what your child already knows.  Use pictures from a magazine or your own family photos with words attached and have your child group the individuals into family units within a “photo frame.”

 

5. Read and Find Game

This is a mash-up of an “I Spy” book and a sensory bin, with practice on reading, hand writing and motor skills thrown in.  You find actual toys with names your child could read, throw them in a bin, make a list of them, and have your child read the list, find the item and write the item down on their own list.  Easy to recreate and easy to learn.

 

6. Rhyming Jars

Gather a few jars and write a simple word on each.  Write words that rhyme with each jar on craft sticks and have your child choose which jar the sticks go in.

 

7. Sight Word Parking Lot

Create a “parking lot” on a piece of poster board with a sight word in each parking space.  Give your child cars and direct them to a spot by calling out a word.

 

8. Sight Word Soup

Using materials from the dollar store, you can easily create this tactile game where kids scoop words out of a “bowl of soup” and identify them.  It’s a fun way to work on letter or word recognition, spelling, reading and fine motor skills.

 

9. Fiddle Sticks

Directions and a picture can be found here.  To create the game, write sight words on the end of craft sticks.  Color the tip of one or two sticks a bright color.  Put the sticks right end down into a cup.  The players take turns drawing one stick at a time and reading the word out loud.  If they can’t read it, they put the stick back in.  If they draw the stick that’s colored, they must put ALL of their sticks back.  Play continues for a predetermined amount of time and the player with the most sticks when the time is up wins.

 

10. Multi-Sensory Activities for teaching Sight Words

Basically, have your child create the sight word with any number of different “sensory” objects.  They can start by copying the sight word from a flash card and move on to spelling it out by themselves after you say it.  Different sensory items they can use to create sight words: play dough, shaving cream (spray it out and have them trace into the cream), sand or salt (have them draw the letters in the sand or salt), pipe cleaners, or yarn.

 

Looking for more ways to engage your 6-9 year old? Try these tips for supplementing your child’s literacy at home.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

 

Loving Literacy: 6 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Literacy Education (ages 6-9)

6 Tips for supplementing your child's literacy education (ages 6-9) ~ Tipsaholic.com #education #literacy #kids

 

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Your child can learn to love literacy with a little help from you!  No matter what stage your child is at in their education, using techniques to supplement their schooling while at home is a key component in their educational success.  By building on their language and literacy education, you are equipping your children with the skills they will need not only for their education, but also in social situations, higher educational opportunities, future workplace and community involvement.  Literacy education is essential for personal growth and success, and the building blocks you lay while they’re in elementary school are crucial.  Ages 6-9 are critical when setting solid habits and foundations.  Here are 6 tips for supplementing your child’s literacy education at home.

 

1. Be aware of critical milestones.

Not only can a missed milestone or two be a sign of issues you don’t want to ignore, but they’re also a great guide for you as a parent.  It’s impossible to understand how to approach education with your child when you have no idea of age and developmental norms.  Read up, study, do some research.  You’ll feel more comfortable, and it’ll take any unnecessary pressure off of you and your child.  For instance, by 6-9 your child generally has increased attention and comprehension, is more comfortable with longer texts, becomes more fluent in common words and sounds, mimics reading habits, has greater phonemic awareness, an expanded vocabulary, and has developed visual literacy skills.  They can also usually begin to monitor themselves while reading.

2. Give them time. 

While reading with your child, make sure to allow them to set the pace.  Give them the time they need to work through words on their own.  If they are struggling, offer clues, but do not read for them.  Clues can be key phrases such as: “What’s the first sound?” “Go through each sound in order.” “What happens when you put [insert letters here] together?” “Look at the words around this one.”  Help them put the unfamiliar words in context by guiding them to skip the word and fill it in by looking at other words or pictures.  Don’t hurry them through a book or tell them to move faster.  Comprehension is just as important as making the sounds, and comprehension takes time.

3. Heap on the praise.

At every step along the way, make sure you are congratulating your child for their hard work.  Correctly identifying sounds that letters make together, figuring out an unfamiliar word, successfully reading a phrase, sentence or book are all reasons to praise your child.  You don’t need to go overboard, but a simple, “I knew you could do it!  Great job!”  Or “You worked so hard on that, that was awesome!” is enough to make your 6-9 year old continue on.  It’s a simple and easy thing to do that will build the kind of confidence in your child that they need.

4. Be consistent.

Make literacy practice a daily thing.  Read to your child, have your child read favorite books to you, point out signs while you drive and have your child read them, play rhyming games by picking a word and taking turns coming up with rhymes, sing songs with rhyming words, talk about alliteration/symbolism/metaphors/synonyms/antonyms/opposites/etc while you’re together on a bike ride, during dinner come up with word families together, on a walk have your child point out everything they see that starts with a certain letter, make games out of the parts of speech that you can play while waiting in lines, etc.  All of these things reinforce learning, make it a common and expected activity, turn it into games and fun and require nothing special from you at all except for your own brain.

5. Use variety.

Don’t stick to only one game or toy to reinforce concepts.  Children can grow bored easily.  If you switch up the games, flash cards, activities, songs and discussions and tweak them to pertain to your child’s specific interests, they’ll retain more information and continue to find the fun in literacy.

6. Model good habits.

Especially at this age, children are learning by mimicking.  That means that what you do is often much more important than what you say.  So make sure your child sees you reading.  Make sure they know you enjoy reading to them.  Keep a public, shared bookcase easily accessible to all members of the family.  Make it something they see, expect and understand so you can pass your good habits on by example.

 

Looking for more great ideas to encourage your child’s literacy skills? Try this list of 10 Language and Literacy Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love!

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Language and Literacy Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love

literacy books 6-9

 

What better way to help your children learn about language and supplement their literacy education than by reading to them?  Kids love bold, colorful picture books which makes them the perfect educational tool.  They’re easily accessible, engaging, and can help create life-long readers.  There are many entertaining and clever books that introduce several beginning building blocks of language, including alphabet identification, parts of speech, rhyming and poetry, storytelling and imagination, idioms and more!  Here is our list of top 10 language and literacy books 6-9 year olds will love.

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1. Ox, House, Stick: The History of Our Alphabet by Don Robb

Do you know how our current alphabet was developed?  This picture book traces the origins of the Roman Alphabet from the proto-Sinaitic peoples, through the Phoenicians, Greeks and Romans.  It also includes information about punctuation, writing materials, technology of printing and more!  This non-fiction book is engaging, with its clear prose and bold illustrations using collage.

2. Aunt Isabel Tells a Good One by Kate Duke

In this endearing tale, a little mouse named Penelope and her Aunt Isabel make up an exciting bedtime story all about Prince Augustine and Lady Penelope.  An adorably attractive story for children, this book will emphasize the importance of imagination and introduce kids to storytelling.

3. My Dog Is As Smelly As Dirty Socks: And Other Funny Family Portraits by Hanoch Piven

This book is one creative alternative to your average family portrait!  Piven uses everyday objects which represent personality traits to create fun portraits of each member in one girl’s family.  The dog, for instance, is created from socks, a clothespin, garlic bulbs, a can of tuna… and each object tells a fun, metaphorical story.  For instance, dad is “as jumpy as a spring, as playful as a top, as fun as a party favor…”  combine each object and the metaphors and you get one ingenious portrait!  Introduce your kids to metaphors through art and text with this clever, quirky story.

4. Poem-Mobiles: Crazy Car Poems by  J. Patrick Lewis and Douglas Florian

This amazing picture book about cars is told in poem-form.  These cars aren’t your average automobiles though, they’re crazy, kooky, inventive little machines; like the “Sloppy-Floppy-Nonstop-Jalopy.”  The quirky poetry and fun-filled illustrations will delight young readers while introducing them to rhyming schemes and poetic elements.

5. The Dangerous Alphabet by Neil Gaiman

This entertaining alphabet book is like no other!  Each letter is part of a grand, adventurous tale all about two kids, their pet gazelle, and a treasure map who sneak out of their house past their father and embark on a fantastical journey.  There are monsters, pirates, and all manner of alphabetical dangers.  Will the children make it out alive?

6. A Zeal of Zebras: An Alphabet of Collective Nouns by Woop Studios

Is it a gaggle of geese or a galaxy?  A galaxy of starfish or a pod?  In this book, readers discover the world of collective nouns while learning the alphabet.  The colorful graphics and fun language is accessible to kids.  But parents will love the clever word play and design-styled, gorgeous pictures.  It can be a centerpiece of your coffee table AND your playroom!

7. A Mink, a Fink, a Skating Rink: What is a Noun?  (and the entire Words Are Categorical series) by Brian P. Cleary

This fun picture book explores elements of English grammar in a very accessible and engaging way.  The playful and clever rhymes throughout the series will help children understand and remember different parts of language.  In What is a Noun? kids are introduced to one of the main building blocks of literacy.  With quirky, colorful pictures and fun text, this book (and the rest of the series) is a fun way to learn.

8.  Many Luscious Lollipops by Ruth Heller

Kids will be drawn into this boldly illustrated book all about adjectives and how to use them.  The brilliant, colorful photos and illustrations grab attention and help give punch to the more technical elements of this book.  The descriptions are a perfect introduction for young kids that will help them understand and explore language.

9. More Parts by Tedd Arnold

This laugh out loud sequel to the book Parts combines catchy, rhyming text with silly, intriguing illustrations to explore the world of idioms.  Introduce an abstract literary element to your kids through this clever, funny book about how to survive broken hearts, jumping out of your skin, and giving someone a helping hand.  Make sure you and your kids don’t come unglued!

10. Firefly July and Other Very Short Poems by Paul B. Janeczko

This adorable picture book with whimsical illustrations introduces young readers to the world of poetry in a cute, embraceable way.  The very short poems prove that it only takes a few well-selected words to paint a very vivid picture.  While it helps kids understand rhyming, cadence, and other poetry ideas, and it also captures their interest through colorful pictures.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Loving Literacy: 5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Literacy Education (ages 3-6)

5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Literacy Education | Tipsaholic.com #education #preschool #kindergarten

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Literacy education is vital to a person’s ultimate success academically, socially and in the workforce.  Begin literacy education at a young age with your child, and they will grow to love reading, writing and even grammar!  It’s never too early to introduce important literacy building blocks, such as alphabet recognition, communication, syntax and proper grammatical structure.  Enhancing kids’ schooling at home when they are in preschool or lower elementary grades will help to build their confidence and increase their understanding, knowledge and grades.  It doesn’t have to be a chore, and when done properly will be an enjoyable and fun experience for you and your child.  Whether they attend private school, a charter school, public school or are home schooled, here are 5 tips for supplementing your child’s literacy education for ages 3-6 that can help you out.

 

1. Know the benchmarks and developmental norms.

Use these as guidelines as you watch, teach and learn with your child.  Every child learns differently, but these developmental benchmarks are there to help raise red flags – so pay attention to them!  Additionally, these milestone markers help you to understand what you can reasonably expect from your child.  (The following articles from WebMD outline these language and cognitive milestones by age group: 3-4 Year Old Milestones, 4-5 Year Old Milestones)

 

2. Know your child.

Each child learns a little differently, and one teaching technique does NOT fit all.  Figure out what kind of learning-style your child has, and gear all your supplemental teaching towards that.  Know what techniques, methods, approaches will help your child feel confident and at ease and which ones to avoid because they cause frustration and stress.  (Here’s a wikihow article than can help to determine your young child’s learning style.)

 

3. Don’t underestimate the mundane.

Literacy development in preschool age kids involves language acquisition and communication skills, as well as letter recognition and letter sounds.  So supplementing their education can be as easy as talking to them.  They need to hear proper communication in order to learn it!  Sing, talk, read – basically just interact with your young child and you’ll be well on your way!

 

4. Keep it simple.

Don’t use overcomplicated methods to aid in your child’s education.  At this stage, short, simple, easy lessons and activities are best since your child has a short attention span and can be easily distracted, bored or frustrated.  As you introduce new lessons, pay attention to your child’s cues and know when to stop or move on.  Frustration at this early age can make you AND your child want to give up!

 

5. Encourage discussion.

Even before your child begins to grasp proper grammar, when their utterances are not fully developed or standardized, encourage conversations with your child.  When someone asks them questions, allow them to answer, don’t answer for them.  Clarify only when necessary.  Correct them by expanding on their sentences and ideas rather than telling them they are wrong – for example, if your child says: “Her go school” you can respond, “Yes, SHE WENT to school earlier today” instead of “No.  SHE, not her.”  This way, you are emphasizing the correct grammar for your child, showing them prepositional use, and expanding their vocabulary by example and avoiding negative associations with correction.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Language and Literacy Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

10 Language and Literacy Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love | Tipsaholic.com #kids #reading #books #literacy

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Supplementing your child’s literacy education doesn’t have to be boring – in fact it can be a lot of fun!  The very best way to encourage literacy education in your preschooler?  Reading to them, of course!  Introducing books to your children at a young age can lead to a life-long love of reading.  You can strengthen letter recognition, practice starting and ending sounds, teach rhyming and speak proper grammar out loud, to name just a few skills.  Here are 10 language and literacy books 3-6 year olds will love.

 

1. Alpha Oops by Alethea Kontis

Z is sick and tired of being last all the time.  The rest of the alphabet agree to go backwards, but it isn’t long before they all get ideas of their own!  It’s every letter for himself in this funny, mixed up romp through the alphabet.  It’s filled with humorous drawings and whimsical details that round out the story of chaos and mayhem!

 

2. The Alphabet Tree by Leo Lionni

A fierce wind is threatening the letters of the alphabet tree.  What can they do to stand against it?  In this darling story the letters learn to band together into words, then sentences to offer a message to the wind.  Will it help?  It’s not only a book about the alphabet and sentences, it also teaches a valuable lesson about the importance of the written word.

 

3. Storybook Treasury of Dick and Jane and Friends by William S. Gray

A compilation of classic and well-loved first-reader storybooks that follow Dick and Jane, along with some new tales.  Parents will love the nostalgia and kids will love the cute and classic tales.

 

4. Not Another Boring ABC Book by Sharon Cohen

A isn’t just for apple anymore!  In this adorable story, kids can join along with Nina, a spunky princess as she has adventures that start with the letters of the alphabet!  Kids have an opportunity to learn the alphabet, along with lessons about alliteration, the power of words, and more.

 

5. My First BOB Books by Lynn Maslen Kertell

This set of tiny first readers is a scholastic award-winning reading program that teaches pre-reading skills and basic literacy concepts.  Through a cute cast of characters and humorous plots, these books lay an important foundation for reading that will appeal to young kids.

 

6. The Turn-Around, Upside-Down Alphabet Book by Lisa Campbell Ernst

At every turn, these letters are full of surprises!  Can your kids discover anything else hidden in the alphabet?  These graphic, colorful pictures are full of fun for kids!

 

7. LMNOPeas by Keith Baker

This cute little alphabet book is filled with jaunty, busy little peas – from acrobats to zoologists!  Follow the peas on their daily pursuits through rhyming text and fun pictures.  Your kids will fall in love!

 

8. Caramel Tree Readers Starter Level: Alphabet Storybooks 1-5 by James Rogers and Sally Crust

Each of these storybooks feature easy to follow and read story lines with cute illustrations.  Each letter has an accompanying song to help retain learning.

 

9. My Very First Book of Words by Eric Carle

Kids will learn to read simple words while matching pictures with words.  These clever matching puzzles are a hit with kids, and Eric Carle’s beloved illustrations are delightful.

 

10. Alphabet Adventure by Audrey Wood

The lower case letters have been working hard and are finally ready for school.  On the way there, i loses her dot and the letters must race to find a substitute.  Small s offers her a star, h a heart, but will they find a suitable replacement?  The cute plot along with engaging illustrations will delight little readers.

 

Also check out this list of 10 Math Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com