10 Hands-On Math Activities for 9-11 year olds

10 Hands On Math Activities for 9-11 Year Olds - Tipsaholic

If you want to start supplementing your child’s math education, but don’t know where to start, you’ve come to the right place!  Hands-on math activities should engage your child in a multitude of ways — physically, verbally, aurally and visually, just to name a few.  By playing and sharing together, you solidify and reinforce difficult math concepts in a fun way that will help kids love math, not just tolerate it.  Here is a list of 10 great options for your 9-11 year old!

10 math activities for 9-11 year olds

Computer Games:

1. Fractions and Decimals – Topmarks

Here you’ll find great games to help your child learn fractions and decimals, including: Magic Math Market, Fraction Beach, Fraction Flags.

2. Shapes, Position and Movement – Topmarks

Activities like Shapes in Space, 3D Exploration, and Sorting on Venn Diagram will capture your child’s attention and imagination.

3. Interactive Tangrams – Interactive Tangrams

A tangram is a puzzle square cut into seven pieces that can be combined to create different figures or shapes.  On this site, you can solve different puzzles by turning the shapes, dragging and dropping them into place.

4. Online practice problems – Adapted Mine

Adapted Mine has a ton of practice problems broken down by category and grade. You’ll definitely want to bookmark this site for future use!

Printables, etc.

5. Tangram Zoo – Annenberg Learner

This link is for a group of printable animal figures to create different figures and shapes.

6. Oxford Owls Activity Sheets – Oxford Owl

Here you’ll find activity sheets on decimals, fractions, and place value. There are also several links to literacy eBooks for 9-11 year olds.

Game and Activities

7. Fraction Cubes, Math Fact Bingo and Dominoes – eHow contributor, Shannon Hill

Playing games like math bingo and dominoes will give your child a chance to have fun while staying challenged.

8. Dry Erase Decimal Activity – Snaps for Fourth Grade

This first-time teacher has some great tips and math activities for you to try with your child.

9. Temperature Card Game – Education.com

Your child will learn about negative and positive integers while determining the direction of temperature on a thermometer with this fun card game

10. M&M Math – Our Journey Westward

Who knew that candy could be such a good teaching tool? You’ll find a multitude of math activities your child can do with M&Ms.

Education.com has a ton of game ideas for this age range.  Check them out here.

 

Feature image via Tutor Nerds

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Math Books 9-11 Year Olds Will Love

math books your 9-11 year old will love

Math isn’t all worksheets and flashcards.  It can be a lot of fun, too!  Reading is a great way to learn together and reinforce concepts.  The following 10 books are a perfect place to start when you’re looking for math books for your 9-11 year old.

10 math books 9-11 years old will love

1. The Grapes of Math by Greg Tang

A book of riddles with tried and true, creative methods for solving math problems by the author.  The vibrant illustrations and fun games will be a hit with kids.  Using effective and simple methods to solve the riddles will give your child confidence.

2. A Very Improbable Story by Edward Einhorn

One morning, Ethan awakes to find an unusual cat – Odds, stuck on his head.  To get rid of the cat, Ethan must win a game of probability, such as pick out two matching socks from his drawer or pull a dime from his coin collection, or some other equally improbable feat.  If he can’t beat the odds, Odds won’t budge, and there’s a 100% chance that Ethan will miss his soccer game!  With this fun plot, entertaining characters and engaging illustrations, this is book is a surefire hit with kids.  It teaches a difficult to grasp concept in a fun way.

3. Math for all Seasons by Greg Tang

More fun riddles and problems to solve in mind-stretching ways.  Great for building Math vocabulary, creativity, and confidence.

4. Math Curse by Jon Scieszka

Do you ever have one of those days where everything is a problem??  This book follows a girl throughout a day filled with “problems” – MATH problems!  A fun look at everyday math.  Charming illustrations with a fun and engaging plot line will have kids begging you to read it.

5. Full House: An Invitation to Fractions by Dayle Ann Dods

Whimsical illustrations and a cast of hilarious characters flow through this book of rhyming text.  Miss Bloom runs the Strawberry Inn and loves to have visitors.  One night, she finds herself with a full house.  Sensing something is amiss, she discovers her guests hungry for a midnight snack.  Will there be enough cake for everyone?  A very inviting read for kids.

6. Mummy Math: An Adventure in Geometry by Cindy Neuschwander

The Zills family is summoned to Egypt to aid in finding the burial chamber of an ancient pharaoh.  When the kids get trapped in a hidden tomb, they must use the geometric hieroglyphics and their knowledge of math to find the burial chamber and escape the tomb.  Will they make it out?  Do they know their stuff?  With a riddle, a mystery and plenty of opportunity for flexing math muscles, kids are sure to find this adventure fun, time and time again.

7. A Remainder of One by Elinor J. Pinczes

When a queen demands that her bugs march in even lines, it’s up to Private Joe to divide and conquer.  Can he split the ants into lines evenly, so he will not be left out?  How many lines will it take?  Fun little drawings will invite young readers in, while the story line engages and teaches a valuable lesson in division.

8. How Big is a Foot? by Rolf Myller

The king wants to give the queen something special for her birthday — not easy when the queen has EVERYTHING.  Except…a bed.  You see, beds hadn’t yet been invented.  The king must figure out “how big is a bed?” – but no one knows!  A cute, fun story with quirky illustrations that will have kids guessing and estimating in measurements.

9. Multiplying Menace: The Revenge of Rumpelstiltskin by Pam Calvert

Follow Peter as he tries to stop Rumpelstiltskin and his multiplying stick.  Can he unlock the secret and rescue the kingdom from Rumpelstiltskin and his mischief?  A fun look at multiplication using familiar characters that kids are sure to love.

10. The Best of Times by Greg Tang

A fun take on the times table.  The author teaches innovative ways to derive solutions to multiplication problems without rote memorization.  The rhyming patterns are easy to remember and the cute illustrations are delightful.

(all photos and links via Amazon)

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

De-Mystifying Math: 8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Math Education (Ages 9-11)

8 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Math Education - Tipsaholic

 

Math.  It’s necessary, requires higher thought processes, and can be completely intimidating for elementary school-aged kids.  If you have the right approach, attitude and mindset as a parent, you can help your child gain not only an understanding and appreciation for math, but perhaps even a fondness.  In any case, supplementing your child’s education is crucial to help them feel at ease with abstract math concepts.  Here are 8 super helpful tips to help your 9-11 year old with math concepts and learning.

8 tips for de-mystifying math

1. Always consider the individual. 

All kids learn best in different ways — be it visually, orally, verbally, physically, etc.  You can find out more information about each different category at Learning Styles Online.  Keep your specific child in mind when considering your approach and remember to tailor their supplemental learning.  By this age, a “one size fits all” mentality towards education could hinder your child rather than help them.

Kids have started approaching schoolwork in a more individual way at this point in their development.  Worksheets (many which can be found online) might work best for a logical or solitary learner, while active games involving kinesthetics and math concepts would work better for a physical learner.

If you need some help identifying the best ways to teach your child, you can take a “multiple intelligences” quiz online and answer the questions as if you were your child.  The following quiz from Edutopia breaks down learning styles into percentages and offers specific information for each style: Multiple Intelligences Learning Styles Quiz.

Also keep in mind your child’s interests and try to fit their math education accordingly.  If they love cars, for instance, use games, activities and story problems involving cars.  If they love animals, use this as a theme for supplemental materials.

2. Do it together.

Chances are your child will be more appreciative of a unified learning approach, so do math together!  Sitting your child down at the computer to play games all by himself won’t have the same impact as learning together and discussing the concepts as you go.  So whatever the learning style, whatever the activity, be present.  If you find that you yourself are unfamiliar with a concept, look it up together and figure it out.  Oxford Owls Jargon Buster is a good place to start if you need help refreshing your memory about math terms.

3. Use a variety of tools, resources and methods.

Even if you’ve recognized your child’s preferred learning style, using the same method or activity repeatedly can cause boredom and disinterest — the exact opposite of our supplemental learning goals.  No matter how much your child loves timed tests or flashcards or dominoes, they’ll still appreciate a little variety.  Some ideas you can do with the whole family (even older or younger siblings), include: planning and budgeting for family outings, baking, planning a schedule, gardening, crafts that involve measuring and cutting shapes, weighing items, grocery shopping, charting growth with tables and graphs, online math games, video games, iPhone or iPad apps and board games.

4. Focus on key concepts appropriate for age and grade.   

Not sure what they are?  Email your child’s teacher and ask!  Talk with other teachers and parents you know.  Here’s a short list for kids ages 9-11 year-olds:  telling time (including adding and subtracting times), measurements (inches, yards, feet, miles, grams, pounds, etc. and converting between metric and imperial measurements), calculating with larger or more complex numbers (including up to three digits, decimals, percentages and fractions), understanding shapes (including 3-dimensional shapes and angles), and using different types of charts, tables and graphs.

5. Watch your own attitude. 

If you don’t approach supplemental education as a chore to be completed, neither will your kids!  Your attitude, more than anything else, shows them what their attitude should be.  Keep your comments, actions and reactions to math homework and any math activities you plan positive.  If your child doesn’t respond positively to a certain planned activity, take it in stride.  Don’t force it, but do come back to it later.  Say something like: “It’s ok.  We don’t have to do this now.  Would you rather help me cut out some shapes for a project I’m working on?” or something similar.  Wait a few days before trying again.  Whatever you do, don’t give up!  And don’t make it “work” but rather “math fun time” or “project time” — something your child can relate to and have desire to do.

6. Make it fun!  

It’ll be easier to accomplish tip number five if you’re focusing on making your supplemental activities fun for your child.  Play games.  Read fun math books.  Laugh while you learn.

7. Establish math as regular and routine.

How many times did you ask “When am I ever  going to use this in my life?” when you were in a math class?  Show your kids that math is a regular, everyday occurrence.  You can do this by not only having some type of supplemental activity every day (and it doesn’t have to be a long, drawn out activity – simple is better!), but also by pointing out instances when your child is using math skills when they may not even notice, such as when they are paying someone at the store and counting out money or when they are figuring out how many hours until bedtime.

8. Include the teacher.  

Whoever that might be — if they’re home-schooled, this is an easy one, just be sure to include your spouse!  Email the teacher for more information about what your child is learning.  Ask the teacher for extra worksheets or ideas for activities.  Use the teacher as a sounding board if you’re having issues approaching math with your child. He or she might have lots of ideas for engaging students that you haven’t thought of.  Your child’s teacher could also have access to or ideas about resources, books, websites, math nights, etc. that they can share with you.  If you’re a homeschooling parent, connect with other homeschooling parents for ideas.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

De-Mystifying Math: 5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Math Education (Ages 6-9)

5 Tips for Supplementing Your Child's Math Education - Tipsaholic


Math can be a daunting subject, particularly when learning complicated concepts for the first time. Reinforcing math education at home is clearly important — whether your child is home-schooled, attends public or private school, goes to a charter school or does school online.  Helping your child develop good habits — not to mention a good attitude — toward math early on is key to success. Here are five tips to help your first through fourth grader get off on the right foot mathematically.

5 Tips fo De-Mystifying Math

1.  Always consider the individual:

Everyone learns in different ways.  Keep your specific child in mind when considering your approach and remember to tailor their supplemental learning.

Learning styles quizzes

If you need some help identifying the best ways to teach your child, you can take a “multiple intelligences” quiz online and answer the questions as if you were your child.  The following quiz from Edutopia breaks down learning styles into percentages and offers specific information for each style: Multiple Intelligences Learning Styles Quiz

2. Use all available resources:

In general, kids ages six to nine learn best visually.  There are so many different ways to make math appeal to your child. Technology is used in amazing ways in public schools, and you can take advantage of it too.

iPhone and iPad apps

Visual math 2 is a great option for first through third graders.  It uses pictures, sounds and lots of fun bonus activities that will make math more like a game.

Websites and blogs

Try the website Math is FUN.  There’s tons of information on different levels of math (i.e. geometry, algebra),  as well as different everyday math concepts (i.e. numbers, money, measurements).  Plus, there are puzzles, games, activities, and printable worksheets.  Do a search on Google and Pinterest and tons of blogs and websites will flood your search engine.

Books

There are tons of math workbooks or mind-teaser type books (like Math for All Seasons by Greg Tang) but there are also a ton of great picture books out there that can make math concepts easy to understand and much less frightening (like Spaghetti and Meatballs for All!  by Marilyn Burns).

3. Make it an everyday thing:

Practice number operations with household objects

Find things that come in groups and talk about how they can be grouped in different ways — for instance, a dozen eggs can be grouped in fours, in threes or in two groups of six.  Look for arrays (rows and columns) around the house, like floor tiles, a bookshelf with cubbies, or checkerboards. Have your child split them into smaller arrays — for instance a carton of eggs is an array of 2×6, but if you split it in half it’s two arrays of 2×3.

When you go to the store, have your child calculate how much you save by buying the cheaper of two brands of the same item.  Have him or her total as many items as possible on the receipt.  If your child likes sports, introduce them to statistics.

Find ways to collect, sort and organize information

Create a chart to track your child’s progress as they conquer math concepts.  Have them sort change into separate funds — tell them to put equal amounts of money in each fund but use different coins.

4. Make it a family thing:

Everyone can get in on the action

Make up story problems together.  Point out different opportunities to count, add, subtract or sort.  Play games together, such as board games, computer games, and riddles.  Get siblings in on the action!

5. Play:

Play lots of games

There are many different board games that use logic and strategic thinking: Monopoly, Chess, Checkers, and Clue are just a few examples.  Games that use flat manipulatives help develop deep logic as well as spatial reasoning – Tangrams, Logix, Blockus, or Shapes Up are all good options.

There are also a wide selection of video games that teach math:

  • For Nintendo DS: Junior Brain Trainer, Math Play, Challenge Me Math Workout, Brain Quest
  • For Nintendo Wii: Reader Rabbit, Smartypants, Think Smart
  • For a PC: Knowledge Adventure – Math Blaster

You can also find many free games online.  Playing lots of games as a family not only makes math tons of fun, but learning together reinforces the importance of math and gives your child confidence.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

10 Hands-On Math Activities for Ages 6-9

10 Hands-On Math Activities (for Ages 6-9) - Tipsaholic.com

 

As your child advances through elementary education, math concepts–even the basics–can become confusing, even frustrating to some.  At ages 6-9, kids are not only fine-tuning basic addition and subtraction and continuing with multiplication and division, they are also learning time, measurements, fractions and more.  It’s not merely important to supplement their math learning at this point in their education, it’s crucial.  Here are some excellent math activities from around the web for making math fun and exciting!

10 Hands-On Math Activities

Computer Games:

Math Lines – at different levels this teacher’s basic math equations, but in a cool, fun way.  You shoot a canon with a specific number ball at the number balls moving around the canon in a line, making sure the balls add up to the target number.

Lemonade Stand – helps teach number recognition, addition and counting money.  You create the lemonade based on reading a recipe, set up and manage your stand, and sell lemonade for a profit.  Come to think of it, you could just set up a real lemonade stand!

Fraction Beach – use your knowledge of fractions to build awesome sandcastles at the beach.

Do a Google search to find many more free computer games that are age appropriate for your child.  Try pbs.orgcoolmath.com or topmarks.

Active Games:

Chalk Clock – use the kids as the hands of the giant clock to work on telling time.

Skip Counting by Hand Outlines – hand outlines are perfect for teaching how to count by 5’s, plus they make for wonderful turkey-themed math activities around Thanksgiving time.

Water Balloon Number Target Practice – learn number recognition through play with water balloons and a chalk target board.

Props and Manipulative Ideas:

Golf Tee Math – use golf tees and play dough to work on creating and solving addition and subtraction equations

Addition Number Family Eggs – put leftover plastic Easter eggs to use by building numbers and solving equations

Coin Value File Folder Games – these file folder games are quick, easy, and cost nothing to make.

Free Printables:

Fraction Bars – practice fractions with these color-coded strips.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Math Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love!

10 Math Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love |Tipsaholic.com #education #math #books #reading #kids

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Math can seem a very daunting endeavor when you’re beginning to learn complex concepts.  Reading picture books is a great way to make math more accessible to our children.  If you want to show your 6-9 year old just how fun math can be, take a look at these great math books!

1. The Penny Pot by Stuart J Murphy

This book was written by a mathematician who travels the US talking to kids about everyday math.  He shows kids how they use math all the time, whether sorting socks or spending their allowance.  The Penny Box is a humorous story that illustrates the fun in math – and hopefully helps kids recognize math as accessible and fun.

2. How Many Jelly Beans? by Andrea Menotti

How many jelly beans are enough? Aiden and Emma can’t decide. Is 10 enough? Or 1,000? That’s a lot of jelly beans. But eaten over a whole year, it’s only two or three a day. This giant picture book offers kids a fun and easy way to understand large numbers. Starting with 10, each page shows more and more colorful candies, leading up to a giant fold-out surprise—ONE MILLION JELLY BEANS!  Kids will love the fun, bright pictures, and learn that big scary numbers can be easily accessible.

3. Inch by Inch by Leo Lionni

In this charming book kids will meet a lovable inchworm who is very proud of his ability to measure absolutely anything.  A great introduction to measurements and mathematical terms, kids will love the characters and the winsome, watercolor-esque illustrations.

4. Pete the Cat and His Four Groovy Buttons by James Dean and Eric Litwin

Pete loves his groovy buttons!  But when one falls off, does he cry?  No!  He just keeps singing his song.  When you count down with Pete the Cat in this fun book that teaches math concepts and subtraction, you’ll feel pretty groovy too!

5. 123 Versus ABC by Mike Boldt

This book explores the age old question, which is more important?  Letters or numbers?  While numbers and letters compete to be the stars of the book, funny props and animals pop in for cameos.  The whimsical illustrations and fresh and funny text introduce readers to letters and numbers in a refreshing way and by the end of the book, the answer to the BIG question is perfectly clear.

6. The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

When Ma makes a dozen delicious cookies, she knows it will be plenty for her two children.  But then, the doorbell rang!  And it keeps on ringing!  In this cute and unpredictable tale, kids will love to count along.

7. How Much Is A Million? by David M. Schwartz

What an abstract concept a million is!  This book takes a look at the concept that has kids wondering and guessing.  Just how much IS a million?  Or a billion?  Or a trillion??  With fantastical images in classic style, this book is sure to engage young readers.

8. Bedtime Math by Laura Overdeck

Bedtime Math has a mission: to make math a fun part of kids’ everyday lives!  Math in this book looks nothing like school, with a kid-friendly and kid-APPEALING take on math problems.  Families are sure to love the riddles, with whimsical illustrations and mischief-making math problems.  There are three different levels in one book, so it’s sure to have something for everyone in the family!

9. The Boy Who Loved Math: The Improbable Life of Paul Erdos by Deborah Heiligman

This book of reader-friendly, lyrical text and rich illustrations explores the life of Paul Erdos, a mathematician who was also a great man.  While introducing readers to math concepts the book also follows Paul from his early start at age-related calculations as a young boy, through the many adventures he has while traveling the world to meet mathematicians and collaborate on publications.  Kids will see what made math for one little boy who loved math!

10. Tally O’Malley by Stuart J. Murphy

The O’Malley’s are off to the beach – a long, hot, LOOOOONG drive!  How will the kids pass the time?  By counting up everything they see by categories – be it green shirts or gray cars.  Whoever has the most marks at the end of the round wins the game.  Eric wins first.  Then Bridget.  It seems like Nell will never win… but she has a surprise in store for her brother and sister!  This book not only introduces math concepts, but shows that math can be a fun game!

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

Featured image courtesy of Mike Boldt.

De-Mystifying Math: 7 Tips for Supplementing Your Child’s Math Education (ages 3-6)

7 Tips for Supplementing your Child's Math Education (Age 3-6) | Tipsaholic.com #math #learning #education #kids #supplement

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Whether your child attends public school, a charter school, uses private school or tutoring or is homeschooled, you probably already know how important it is to reinforce classroom learning at home. Fortunately, there’s an overabundance of information online to help you teach your little ones at home, especially during the summer, BUT where do you start?

Math especially is often difficult for young children to grasp since it deals in abstracts.  Supplemental math education doesn’t have to be tricky.

Here are 7 super useful tips for applying Math concepts to your home life:

 

1.  Always consider the individual. 

We all know that everyone learns in different ways.  Keep your specific child in mind when considering your approach and remember to tailor their supplemental learning.

If you need some help identifying the best ways to teach your child, you can take a “multiple intelligences” quiz online and answer the questions as if you were your child.  The following quiz from edutopia breaks down learning styles into percentages and offers specific information each style.  Multiple Intelligences Learning Styles Quiz

 

2. Appeal to his/her interests.

If you want your child to enjoy learning with you, you’ll need to make it fun for them.  Pay attention to their hobbies and likes, be it cars, drawing, singing, dressing up, collecting leaves or what have you.  Use these to create learning experiences that coincide with things they already love.

 

3. Keep it simple.

The best way to teach a young child is with hands on activities that don’t take a ton of resources or explanation.  Most of the time, your most successful teaching experiences will incorporate things you already have around the house and will require little planning on your part.

 

4. Keep it short.

Generally speaking, a young child can only focus on one learning activity for about 10-15 minutes at a time.  Don’t plan long or involved math lessons that take longer than this to accomplish, or you are sure to lose your child’s interest.  You can do multiple different math activities within a specific span of time, but they will each need to be short and simple.

 

5. Be hands-on

Whatever learning style your child prefers, math concepts tend to “stick” better when children can “handle” the things they’re learning about.  Allowing them to use their hands or bodies gives each abstract math idea more meaning.

 

6. Give math concepts an everyday application.

When you’re at the grocery store, you can have your child count out individual items (“I need four apples…) or help you use the scale.  They can also get a basic understanding of money if you let them pay and handle change.  When you’re walking to your car you can count steps.  Take giant steps and mini steps and talk about the difference in number.  While you drive, you can play “I Spy” with shapes.  At home, you can play sorting games with almost anything – folding socks, putting groceries away, etc. If you make math a part of everyday life, it won’t seem like a chore.

 

7. Most importantly, keep it fun! 

You don’t need worksheets to teach math! Use games, songs and rhymes, props/toys/manipulatives, and books!

 

DON’T FORGET: little learners need a functional, organized space to keep them engaged and attentive.  Check out these super organized school-related spaces on Remodelaholic!  Tons of easy to implement solutions to keep kids excited about learning!

 

* For more tips and ideas, check out these links!

Blog Me Mom – “Math Play” and “ABC’s of Math” series

Mom’s Heart – Living Math for Preschoolers

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

8 Hands-On Math Activities for 3-6 Year Olds

Hands-on Math for Toddlers and Preschoolers | Tipsaholic.com #education #math #kids #games #fun #learning

 

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Supplementing your child’s math education is a big job, but reinforcing school-taught concepts is important.  Fortunately, math concepts can be fun and easy to review – all it takes is a little creativity and imagination.  You can make abstract math much more concrete and natural for your child with just a small effort. Here are 8 clever hands-on math activities your 3-6 year old will love!

 

GAMES

1. Delia Creates has a post dedicated to “Chalk Games”.   Here you’ll find “Math Race” with bikes (or just running!) that works on number or shape recognition and “Number Twister,” a mathematical take on the classic party game.  And be sure to check out the sundial using a paper towel holder where she keeps track of a daily routine.

2. Adventures in Learning shares a great matching game using beans as manipulatives that will help with counting and number recognition (or simple equations).  It’s called Apple Seed Math.

3. Teach Preschool shows how to use dominoes for teaching math – work on patterning with black and white dominoes, or use giant foam board dominoes and plastic lids to work on matching dots and to talk about number recognition.  (Colorful dominoes – like the ones shown here – are sure to attract kids’ attention!)

4. Also from Teach Preschool, check out her Salt Box Shapes.  They are a fun take on the salt box sensory learning activities usually used for letters or to write numbers.

5. Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational has a phenomenal idea called “Catapult Math” that you can apply to number or shape recognition.  She includes directions for making your own mini catapult!

6. Nurture Store uses “Lego Math” to measure and graph things, work on symmetry, add and subtract, sort colors and shapes, and create patterns.  (side note: you can find legos in bulk right here for a great price!)

 

SONGS

7. Songs, rhymes and finger plays are excellent ways to get your kids counting.  Find the lyrics and music to the following examples (and more!) at Topmarks.

  • Five Little Monkeys
  • Five Little Speckled Frogs
  • Five Bears in the Bed
  • Six Little Ducks
  • Once I Caught a Fish Alive

 

PROPS/TOYS

8. The best hands-on experiences can also be the simplest!  Give your children small items they can touch and manipulate in order to count, match, sort, pattern, etc.  This is the easiest way to introduce addition and subtraction, too.  You can see an example of this type of manipulative play at No Time For Flashcards – Candy Apple Math Game.

Here’s a list of favorite inexpensive or free manipulatives: buttons, dried beans, plastic lids, beads, craft pom poms, legos, edibles (chocolate chips, goldfish, raisins, m&m’s).

Just make sure they are easy for little hands to grasp.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Math Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

10 Math Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love | Tipsaholic.com #learning #kids #math #books #reading

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If you’re in the market for different techniques to supplement your child’s school-taught math education at home, don’t overlook something you’re probably already doing!  Reading to your child encourages all kinds of skills – from letter and sound recognition to imagination to critical thinking and problem solving skills.  With the right kind of picture books, your 3-6 year olds will love learning about math concepts too! Check out these fun and entertaining math books.

 

1. Zero by Kathryn Otoshi

Every other number is worth something, but when Zero looks at herself, all she sees is a big hole in her center.  If she could look like the other numbers, she’d count too.  This book is not only a lesson in personal worth, but a fun way to learn about numbers and counting.

2. One by Kathryn Otoshi

Blue is a quiet color who, for some reason, Red is always picking on.  Yellow, Orange, Green, and Purple don’t like what they see, but what can they do about it?  This combines learning about primary and secondary colors, as well as counting.  But it also teaches an important lesson about standing together and making a difference – even if you are only one.

 

3. My Very First Book of Numbers by Eric Carle

Do you know how many apples there are?  How many cherries?  This is a puzzle book in which the reader identifies the numeral and number of black boxes on the top half of the page and then matches this to the correct number of fruits shown on the bottom half of the page.  Colorful, vibrant, graphic and fun, this book makes number recognition, counting and matching a game!

 

4. I Spy Numbers by Jean Marzollo

This book uses simple picture clues and rhyming riddles to guide young children through learning about numbers, counting and simple math concepts.  It’s specifically geared to preschoolers and kindergarteners who will love all 12 of the bright, colorful, interesting spreads.

 

5. Rainbow Fish Counting by Marcus Pfister

Young children learn numbers 1-10 with dazzling illustrations of undersea creatures and plants, including the well-loved Rainbow Fish himself!  Bold numerals shown along with the appropriate sea creatures help with number recognition while appealing visually to a young audience.

 

6. Ten Apples Up On Top! by Theo LeSieg

This classic story introduces kids to three lovable characters who can perform all kinds of giggle-inducing tricks!  The Lion, dog and tiger discover that they can do a lot of fun things – from drinking milk to jumping rope and roller skating – all while balancing apples on their heads.  How many can they keep up?  Will they let them fall?  Kids love to count along.

 

7. How Do Dinosaurs Count to Ten? by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

Young readers love these familiar dino characters and their crazy antics!  They’re at it again, this time teaching kids to count from 1 to 10.  The pages are full of rhyming text and silly illustrations that are sure to capture attention.  It makes learning numbers and counting BIG fun!

 

8. Gobble, Gobble Crash! by Julie Stiegemeyer

It all starts with four naughty, noisy turkeys and soon the whole barnyard is awake!  Did they really intend to wake the farmer in the middle of the night as well??  Kids will find the illustrations hilarious as they count up to 10 and all the way back down in fun rhyming text.

 

9. The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns

Bored with his current situation, a triangle visits a local shapeshifter to have some alterations made.  Adding another angle makes him a quadrilateral!  But that’s just not enough for this greedy shape.  Children will love finding out what happens as the triangle adds angle after angle until he is completely transformed!  What a fun introduction to shapes and basic math concepts!

 

10. Shape by Shape by Suse MacDonald

Each page of this bright, vivid book reveals another shape clue about a creature from long ago.  The die-cut pages are full of attention-grabbing colors and shapes that come together in a large, fold-out page for the grand reveal.  Circles become eyes, triangles become scales… will your young reader deduce what awaits on the final page?

 

Also check out this list of 10 Language and Literacy Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com