10 Science Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love

If you want to reinforce science concepts at home, reading picture books with your kids is a great idea! 10 Science Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #books, #read, #kids, #education, #sciencebooks

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As children start school and begin acquiring reading skills, designated reading time at home becomes even more important.  While your child is learning to be a more competent reader, they are also absorbing more information about a variety of subjects.  If you want to foster a love of science in your early elementary aged child, one of the best ways to do this is through books!  Picture books are engaging and entertaining, even when they’re full of scientific facts!  Not sure where to start?  Here are 10 science books 6-9 year olds will love!

If you want to reinforce science concepts at home, reading picture books with your kids is a great idea! 10 Science Books 6-9 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #books, #read, #kids, #education, #sciencebooks

 

1. Science Verse by Jon Scieszka –

Written by the creator of the famed “Math Curse”, this book all about different science concepts is sure to tickle kids’ funny bones!  Covering such topics as the food-chain, black holes, combustion, amoebas, metamorphosis, the universe – and more! – in quirky, silly, rhyming verse, this book is pure fun.  It combines clever illustration and witty writing to create a scientifically accurate celebration!

 

2. The Moon Seems to Change by Franklyn M. Branley –

Have your children ever wondered why the moon looks different from night to night?  This book covers some basic astronomical concepts – like how the moon revolves around the earth.  With step-by-step instructions, your kids can conduct an experiment using only an orange, a pencil and a flashlight that will help them visually understand what is happening to the moon.  Teach your kids about the phenomena of the moon’s phases!

 

3. Magnets: Pulling Together, Pushing Apart by Natalie Rosinsky –

Magnets affect our lives in many unseen ways!  Have you ever watched a child play with magnets?  They love the magic behind them!  Watch them get even more excited as they read this book and learn all about how magnets work – from compasses and magnetite to the magnetic poles to motors!

 

4. Bite-Sized Science by John H. Falk –

The only thing better than reading about science is DOING it!  This book is an introduction to many elements of science – including the scientific process!  Teach children to observe and evaluate the natural world through short, “bite-sized” activities and demonstrations you can do together.  Each one is 15 minutes or less, including set up and clean up, which makes them perfect for kids.  Kids get to make predictions, test them and observe results.  What’s more, a lot of them involve food, so your kids can eat their experiments!

 

5. What is the Earth Made Of? by Katherine Weidner Zoehfeld –

Young readers will be engaged with the cute and colorful illustrations in this book, while the text is perfect for read aloud fun.  It’s an introduction to a very important scientific building block: solids, liquids and gases; and how they can change states of matter!  Kids will love learning about ice cubes, water and gas – evaporation and what it all means for the world around them.

 

6. Wiggling Worms at Work by Wendy Pfeffer –

Those creepy crawlies you love finding in the lawn?  They’re part of science!  You’re child will love learning all about worms and how they help soil, compost and plants!  The realistic pictures might make them squirm, but they’ll be intrigued by these wiggly wonders!

 

7. Science in Seconds for Kids by Jean Potter –

This awesome book contains 100 science experiments you can do with your kids in ten minutes or less!  Most of them seem like magic – like seeing colors that aren’t really there, or staying dry underwater! – but the book also explains the why behind what you’re doing, so your kids will have tons of fun while learning.

 

8. National Geographic Kids First Big Book of Space by Catherine D. Hughes –

This book is chock full of wonderful pictures and interesting facts about the universe in which we live.  The book is divided into short chapters that explain basic concepts of space, beginning with what is most familiar to children and moving outward into the universe.  The simple text and vivid graphics will grab their attention.

(check out the other National Geographic Kids books, as well!)

 

9. Gravity is a Mystery by Franklyn M. Branley –

Everyone knows that when you drop or throw something, it will fall to the ground.  But WHY does that happen?  There’s a mysterious force pulling us all toward the center of the earth, and no one really knows what it is.  In this book, you can follow along with an adventurous scientist and his funny dog as they learn all about gravity.

 

10. Forces and Motion: A Question and Answer Book by Catherine A. Welch –

This book uses real life settings with photographs to explain the basic elements of physical science.  Through question and response, kids learn all about air resistance, mass and gravity and the connection between force and motion.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

More science fun:

5 Hands-On Science Activities for 6-9 Year Olds - Tipsaholic         supplement science ed          10 Science Books for 9-11 Year Olds - Tipsaholic

Hands-On Science                Science Education                  More Science Books

10 Science Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

Reading picture books together is the perfect way to supplement your child's education. Here are 10 science books your pre-reader will love! 10 Science Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #kids, #education, #preschool, #sciencebooks

 

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Reading books out loud to young children is a great way to introduce new concepts and reinforce learning.  Picture books for pre-readers are specifically designed to be read aloud while engaging young kids.  Science doesn’t have to be complicated or boring, and reading about scientific ideas together can help kids feel more confident about what they learn.  If you’re not sure where to start, here are 10 science books 3-6 year olds will love.

 

Reading picture books together is the perfect way to supplement your child's education. Here are 10 science books your pre-reader will love! 10 Science Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #science, #kids, #education, #preschool, #sciencebooks

 

1. What is Science? by Rebecca Kai Dotlich –

From soil to rocks, hurricanes to airplanes and planets and stars, science is all around us!  This book is a charming introduction to science told through rhyming verse and colorful, cute illustrations.  Kids will be delighted to learn that science is a part of the world they already know.

 

2. Clouds by Anne Rockwell –

Your children will love applying what they learn in this book all about watching the clouds for weather clues!  A basic introduction to meteorology, the simple text is perfect for young children.

 

3. Dinosaurs Big and Small by Kathleen Weidner Zoehfeld –

This is sure to be a favorite with kids.  As the book introduces very basic paleontology through pictures and easy to read text, it also compares specific dinosaurs to familiar objects from today.  Kids will retain the information they learn as it is applied to the world around them now.

 

4. A Germ’s Journey by Thom Rooke, MD –

It’s natural for little kids to wonder how they get sick, and hard for them to relate to something so tiny they can’t even see it!  This funny adventure follows a cold germ on it’s journey, and your child can follow it from sniffle to snuffle to sneeze!

 

5. My 5 Senses by Aliki –

There is simply no better way to introduce preschoolers to science than by talking about their senses!  After all, what is science but discovery, observation, and hypothesizing through our senses.  Kids will love learning all about what they can discover on their own through delightful pictures and simple text.  They’ll be ready to see, hear, small, taste and touch their way through the scientific process!

 

6. My Amazing Body by Pat Thomas –

Just think about everything your body can do!  This simple introduction to physical fitness and health science is perfect for pre-readers.  Kids learn about diet, exercise and health in an easily understandable way.  The book also encourages independence by exploring the importance of making good decisions about taking care of their bodies.

 

7. Motion by Darlene R. Stille –

Think physics is too difficult for preschoolers to grasp?  Think again!  This fun book has bright, graphic images and simple text that explains motion in relatable ways.  Kids learn about movement, speed, force and inertia by thinking about their own motion.

 

8. Sleep is for everyone by Paul Showers –

Did you know that sleep is part of science?  It’s true!  Kids will particularly enjoy learning about an everyday occurrence that applies to science concepts.  Read lots of eye-opening facts about the science of snoozing.  Help your kids understand the why behind sleep, and bedtime might be even easier!

 

9. Light by Natalie M. Rosinsky –

Young kids are naturally intrigued by light and its properties, so read this book with them and learn all about the science behind it!  Kids can learn how to make shadows, reflections and even rainbows.  They’re sure to be engaged by the cute illustrations.

 

10. From Caterpillar to Butterfly by Deborah Heiligman –

Follow the life cycle of a butterfly with this easy to understand storyline.  A caterpillar come to school in a jar and the class watches as it changes – growing larger and creating a chrysalis – but one day the caterpillar is gone!  Where did it go?  The colorful drawings in this book are eye-catching, and kids will love this basic introduction to metamorphosis.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

More education ideas:

10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic          literacy education         tipsaholic-tips-for-supplementing-your-childs-science-education-pinterest-pic

Art Education Books               Literacy Activities                 Science Activities

10 Charming Christmas Tales for Kids

Themed books can help the holidays come alive for kids!  Of course there are the classics – Twas The Night Before Christmas, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, The Polar Express – but if you’re looking for a few fresh Christmas Stories to update your holiday library, here are 10 ideas you may not know about yet.

Themed books can help the holidays come alive for kids!  Of course there are the classics - Twas The Night Before Christmas, How the Grinch Stole Christmas, The Polar Express - but if you're looking for a few fresh Christmas Stories to update your holiday library, here are 10 Christmas Stories via @tipsaholic #christmas #kids #story #stories

10 Charming Christmas Tales for kids

 

1. Olive, The Other Reindeer by Vivian Walsh – Olive always thought she was a dog, until she realizes the Christmas song is talking about her, “Olive, the other reindeer!”  So she hops on the Polar Express and heads to the North Pole.  Can she offer anything useful to the regular reindeer team?  It’s a hilarious read with fun, graphic illustrations that will make your Christmas merry.

 

2. Christmas Alphabet Deluxe Anniversary Edition by Robert Clarke Sabuda – This beautiful pop-up version of Sabuda’s Christmas book celebrates the sights and symbols of Christmas.  Kids can learn about the alphabet and Christmas, as well as artistic elements of form, color, space and composition with the elegant and imaginative paper pop-ups.

 

3. When Jesus Was Born in Bethlehem by Joseph Brickey – This is a beautiful way to share the story of the first Christmas with your kids.  Gorgeous paintings tell the story of Christ’s birth in a moving way.

 

4. The Spirit of Christmas by Nancy Tillman – A beautifully illustrated picture book that will help your child understand the spirit of Christmas.  Sleds, jingle bells, Christmas trees, candy canes and presents are all fun parts of the holiday, but the true magic of the season comes when you spend Christmas with those you love.

 

5. Snowmen at Christmas by Caralyn Buehner – The snowmen from Buehner’s “Snowmen at Night” are back to share how they celebrate Christmas!  The fun, rhyming text and silly snowmen pictures make this an entertaining read for kids.

 

6. Mr. Willowby’s Christmas Tree by Robert Barry – Mr. Willowby excitedly sets up his Christmas tree which was sent by special delivery!  But he didn’t realize it would be much too tall… He trims the top, which ends up as a Christmas tree for his maid, but it’s too tall for her.  When she trims the top, it ends up as a Christmas tree for the gardner.  And on it goes… each person’s trimmings ending up as a tree for someone else.

 

7. Dream Snow by Eric Carle – It’s Christmas Eve and the Farmer settles in for the night wondering how Christmas will come with no snow.  In his dream, he imagines a snowstorm covering him and his animals, but when he wakes up he discovers the dream has come true!  Then he remembers he has a wonderful Christmas surprise in store.  Told in classic Eric Carle style, the lively collage-like illustrations and a simple, endearing story will make this book a favorite.

 

8. A Wish To Be a Christmas Tree by Colleen Monroe – A poor, overgrown pine is passed by Christmas after Christmas.  What can his woodland friends do to help?  Follow the enchanting text and delightful illustrations to see if this tree’s wish will come true.

 

9. Follow The Star by Andy Mansfield- This pop-up book features intricate, graphic paper pop-ups and cut-outs.  The beautiful spreads are accompanied by a delightful story about the Christmas star. Follow the Christmas star on magical journey, including its first night in the sky above Bethlehem, lighting up a giant Christmas tree and shining high above Santa’s flying sleigh; this book ties all the magic of the season together.

 

10. Drummer Boy by Loren Long – The classic Christmas song, “The Little Drummer Boy” is brought to life through amazing illustrations and charming text.  Kids will get a taste of true magic as they follow the Drummer Boy in the story on an accidental adventure after he is knocked into the trash.

Featured Image via Amazon.

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Here is more inspiration:

gift boxes         Elf on the shelf        Christmas Wreath

Adult Gift Ideas                     Elf on the Shelf Ideas           DIY Christmas Wreaths

polka dot         8 Cranberry Dessert Recipes - Tipsaholic.com        13 Easy Side Dishes for Winter Gatherings - Tipsaholic.com

DIY Stockings                        Cranberry Desserts                Winter Side Dishes

10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

Learning with your child can be fun. Teach them in a variety of ways. Teach about art and reading with these 10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #art, #education, #kids, #books, #read, #kidsbooks, #artbooks, #preschool

 

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Art is an important and vastly under-appreciated element of education.  Fortunately, there are a myriad of ways you can supplement art education in your home.  Reading books to your child is one valuable tool for learning.  Children will become better readers and writers while having fun with you and learning about art.  There are so many different aspects of art education you could focus on – history, masters, colors, hues, composition, to name just a few – that it’s hard to know what your focus should be.  Here are 10 art education books geared to preschoolers that your 3-6 year olds will love!

Learning with your child can be fun. Teach them in a variety of ways. Teach about art and reading with these 10 Art Education Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love - Tipsaholic, #art, #education, #kids, #books, #read, #kidsbooks, #artbooks, #preschool

1. Art by Patrick McDonnell –

This cute picture book tells the story of Art and his art.  Art is a budding young artist – like so many children.  Follow along and watch as Art creates His fun masterpieces all over the pages of the book.  With rhyming verse and messy, colorful illustrations, this is sure to be a hit with young kids.

 

2. Mini Masters Board Book Series by Julie Merberg and Suzanne Bober –

(Dancing with Degas, A Picnic with Monet, A Magical Day with MatisseIn the Garden with Van Gogh)

These books combine rhyming text, short and simple phrasing and beautiful works from master artists.  Young kids will learn about Degas, Monet, Matisse and Van Gogh in a fun, engaging and positive way.  The artwork is vivid and beautiful and sure to delight even older readers.

 

3. The Dot by Peter H. Reynolds –

“Just make a mark and see where it takes you.” The art teacher says, but Vashti is not convinced.  She is not an artist and instead, she jabs angrily at the paper leaving an unremarkable dot.  That dot, however, leads her on a completely unforeseen adventure through self-discovery and creativity.  Children can learn right along with her as they recognize the value of each person’s unique, creative spirit.

 

4. Perfect Square by Michael Hall –

One perfect square.  But oh!  What a square CAN be!  This adventurous story shows kids how a simple square of construction paper can transform into unlimited possibilities.  Kids will be excited not only for the next page and the coming surprised, but will love applying this in their own creative lives.

 

5. Press Here by Herve Tullet –

This is no mere book about dots and colors, oh no!  Press the dot and the book comes to life, bringing with it a magical, tactile adventure!  Young kids will love following the instructions in this interactive book.  They’ll press, shake, blow, tilt and jab their way through the pages and find delight in the shapes and vibrant colors.

 

6. Beautiful Oops by Barney Saltzberg –

With endearing drawings, vibrant colors and beautiful text, this book gives kids a lovely life lesson.  Mistakes are ok.  In fact, mistakes are great!  They can help you learn and grow, lead to discoveries, and cultivate creativity.  A spill on your masterpiece doesn’t have to ruin it.  Look for a way to turn mistakes into art – when you’re drawing or in life.

 

7. Seen Art? by Jon Scieszka –

This hilarious romp through New York City’s Museum of Modern Art will have your kids begging for more!  When the main character loses track of his friend, Art, he is directed to MoMA instead.  He continues through the museum, looking for his friend, and in the process learns much about famous artists – Matisse, Van Gogh, Picasso and others.  Your kids can learn right alongside him with these playful illustrations and clever, comical text.

 

8. Touch the Art: Count Monet’s Lilies by Julie Appel and Amy Guglielmo –

This is a wonderful introduction to impressionism for very young budding artists with paintings by Monet, Renoir, Cézanne, and Degas to name a few.  This book is a wonderful take on the average “touch and feel” genre and is a tactile experience for young kids who will love feeling bumpy bark on trees, patting fancy hats and counting fruit.  They’ll increase fine motor skills and learn about famous artists at the same time!  (See the other “Touch the Art” books in the series as well)

 

9. The Most Magnificent Thing by Ashley Spires –

In this creative tale with vibrant, quirky pictures, the unnamed heroine sets out to create the most magnificent thing.  She has a plan and knows just what she needs to do.  After trying and failing time after time, she decides to give up.  What will happen to her creative vision?  Is it lost for good?  Kids will learn just as much vocabulary from the witty text with fun and functional action words and trilogies of verbs as they will about perseverance, negative emotions and creation.

 

10. The Museum by Susan Verde –

This whimsical look at art is told through charming illustrations and simple, lighthearted text.  Follow the main character on an adventure through an art museum, where each piece speaks to her in a different way.  This playful tale captures the emotion and experience of art, and children will better understand how artwork communicates to others and how they can feel energized to create and express themselves.

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

For more educational ideas try these:

10 Hands-On Math Activities - Tipsaholic.com               tipsaholic-10-math-books-3-6-year-olds-will-love-pinterest-pic              hands on science

Math for 3-6 Year Olds              Math Books 3-6 Year Olds        Science for 3-6 Year Olds

How to Raise Kids Who Love Learning

How to Raise Kids Who Love Learning - Tipsaholic.com

The human brain is blessed with a huge capacity for learning, especially during the childhood years. Unlock your children’s innate ability to teach themselves and ensure that they fall in love with the wonderful act of learning! Here’s a few tips you can use to encourage your kids to love learning.

tipsaholic - how to raise kids who love learning

1. Provide little (or no) instructions.

This sounds weird, but it works. Sergio Juárez Correa’s students (in Matamoros, Mexico) flourished when the teacher decided to take a different approach to teaching. For example, instead of showing students how to reach the correct answer to a math problem, he asked them how they would figure it out. And figure it out they did. These students went on to score the highest on the achievement test in the country.

Ideas of what you can do:

  • Give them a toy that has several functions (bleeps, flashes, rolls, etc) and just let them figure out how to play with it without showing them anything.
  • Hand them a tablet or a computer with a newly purchased app or game and let them explore.
  • Take your kids to a museum and let them guide you to whatever exhibits they want to see.
  • Give them a board game and let them teach themselves how to play.
  • Toys like the Bilibo don’t even come with instructions, so every kid plays with them in different ways. Hand them this cool toy and watch them create new ways to play!

2. Allow for lots of time for play.

Recess is generally thought of as a break from learning, but recent studies have shown that playing is actually vital for optimal brain development. Playing helps develop problem solving skills, creativity, stimulates curiosity, and more. This in turn helps children do better at school, learn better, and love learning.

Things you can do to encourage your kids to play more:

  • Host more play-dates at your home or at a playground.
  • Bring in more games of all kinds for your kids.
  • Engage in play with your kids whenever you can.
  • Rotate your kids’ toys so there’s always something “new” to play with.
  • Have your kids join an after-school program.

3. Let them teach themselves how to read.

This article claims that young children can teach themselves how to read, if they are allowed to do so. Different kids do it in different ways, but generally, parents of these children provide an environment in their homes that is conductive to reading. When young kids are able to read, they are able to teach themselves new things. They’ll love learning thanks to their love for reading.

Here’s what you can do to create a reading-friendly home:

  • Make lots of books available to your kids.
  • Take them to the library often.
  • Let kids see you reading books and enjoying it.
  • Don’t force kids into reading.
  • Read to them on a regular basis when they’re young.
  • Have them see you use a variety of reading materials to accomplish things, such as following instructions to complete a DIY project or trying out a new recipe.

Once a child loves to learn, they can teach themselves anything and there won’t be a limit to what they can do.

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

10 Math Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love

10 Math Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love | Tipsaholic.com #learning #kids #math #books #reading

tipsaholic-10-math-books-3-6-year-olds-will-love-title
If you’re in the market for different techniques to supplement your child’s school-taught math education at home, don’t overlook something you’re probably already doing!  Reading to your child encourages all kinds of skills – from letter and sound recognition to imagination to critical thinking and problem solving skills.  With the right kind of picture books, your 3-6 year olds will love learning about math concepts too! Check out these fun and entertaining math books.

 

1. Zero by Kathryn Otoshi

Every other number is worth something, but when Zero looks at herself, all she sees is a big hole in her center.  If she could look like the other numbers, she’d count too.  This book is not only a lesson in personal worth, but a fun way to learn about numbers and counting.

2. One by Kathryn Otoshi

Blue is a quiet color who, for some reason, Red is always picking on.  Yellow, Orange, Green, and Purple don’t like what they see, but what can they do about it?  This combines learning about primary and secondary colors, as well as counting.  But it also teaches an important lesson about standing together and making a difference – even if you are only one.

 

3. My Very First Book of Numbers by Eric Carle

Do you know how many apples there are?  How many cherries?  This is a puzzle book in which the reader identifies the numeral and number of black boxes on the top half of the page and then matches this to the correct number of fruits shown on the bottom half of the page.  Colorful, vibrant, graphic and fun, this book makes number recognition, counting and matching a game!

 

4. I Spy Numbers by Jean Marzollo

This book uses simple picture clues and rhyming riddles to guide young children through learning about numbers, counting and simple math concepts.  It’s specifically geared to preschoolers and kindergarteners who will love all 12 of the bright, colorful, interesting spreads.

 

5. Rainbow Fish Counting by Marcus Pfister

Young children learn numbers 1-10 with dazzling illustrations of undersea creatures and plants, including the well-loved Rainbow Fish himself!  Bold numerals shown along with the appropriate sea creatures help with number recognition while appealing visually to a young audience.

 

6. Ten Apples Up On Top! by Theo LeSieg

This classic story introduces kids to three lovable characters who can perform all kinds of giggle-inducing tricks!  The Lion, dog and tiger discover that they can do a lot of fun things – from drinking milk to jumping rope and roller skating – all while balancing apples on their heads.  How many can they keep up?  Will they let them fall?  Kids love to count along.

 

7. How Do Dinosaurs Count to Ten? by Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

Young readers love these familiar dino characters and their crazy antics!  They’re at it again, this time teaching kids to count from 1 to 10.  The pages are full of rhyming text and silly illustrations that are sure to capture attention.  It makes learning numbers and counting BIG fun!

 

8. Gobble, Gobble Crash! by Julie Stiegemeyer

It all starts with four naughty, noisy turkeys and soon the whole barnyard is awake!  Did they really intend to wake the farmer in the middle of the night as well??  Kids will find the illustrations hilarious as they count up to 10 and all the way back down in fun rhyming text.

 

9. The Greedy Triangle by Marilyn Burns

Bored with his current situation, a triangle visits a local shapeshifter to have some alterations made.  Adding another angle makes him a quadrilateral!  But that’s just not enough for this greedy shape.  Children will love finding out what happens as the triangle adds angle after angle until he is completely transformed!  What a fun introduction to shapes and basic math concepts!

 

10. Shape by Shape by Suse MacDonald

Each page of this bright, vivid book reveals another shape clue about a creature from long ago.  The die-cut pages are full of attention-grabbing colors and shapes that come together in a large, fold-out page for the grand reveal.  Circles become eyes, triangles become scales… will your young reader deduce what awaits on the final page?

 

Also check out this list of 10 Language and Literacy Books 3-6 Year Olds Will Love.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

 

10 Awesome Kids’ Books (you may not know about)

Is your children’s library a bit stale?  While we all have favorite kids’ books, sometimes reading the same well-loved tale over and over can be kind of… boring.  It’s great to stock up on the classics – stories you read as a child, gems from favorite authors, characters your kids love – maybe you need a little inspiration.  This top ten list of awesome kids books may give you a few new ideas!

10 Awesome Kids Books (you might not know about) via Tipsaholic

10 Awesome Kids Books to Add to Your Shelf

Ducks Don’t Wear Socks by John Nedwidek 

Nedwidek tells the story of Emily – a VERY serious girl who likes doing VERY serious things like playing the cello.  But one day, she runs into Duck – who is definitely NOT serious.  Duck likes to plant crops in the park, ride a stick horse around town, and above all: wear things a duck is NOT supposed to wear.  Through a series of humorous run-ins, Duck teaches Emily (and the reader!) the importance of laughter and fun.

 

Roar of a Snore by Marsha Diane Arnold 

Jack Huffle’s peaceful sleep is disturbed by one big roar of a snore!  At first, he blames his faithful dog, but upon discovering it isn’t him the two set off on a search for the culprit.  They wake Mama Gwyn, Papa Ben, Baby Sue and more, to no avail.  Each family member joins the search in turn and they follow their ears to make a most surprising discovery!  Kids will be delighted with the rhymes and cadence, and will particularly love roaring along with the snorer!

I Love You Through and Through by Bernadette Rosetti Shustak 

This book of charming illustrations features a silly toddler and his stuffed bear with fun rhyming text.  It not only teaches children about emotions, but also portrays the great love parents have for their little ones.

 

My Many Colored Days by Dr. Seuss

This is a very atypical Dr. Seuss book, but a great read, nonetheless.  In this book, Seuss describes emotions and moods using colors, animals and actions.  His rhyming text is accompanied by bright, vivid paintings which create a sensational experience for the reader.  Kids will easily relate to the book which uses such imagery as a bright red horse kicking his heels, a very sad purple dinosaur, and a cool, quiet calm, green fish – among many others.  This book is a great way to give words and meanings that a child will understand to what can be potentially confusing and abstract ideas.

 

Not a Box by Antoinette Portis 

This cute book features a quirky little rabbit and just one old cardboard box.  Or is it?  Children will learn the importance and fun of imagination as they follow this rabbit in his imaginative play.  From a firetruck to a mountain to a rocket ship, little rabbit shows how imagination transports us to a world with no limitations – where anything is possible.

 

Don’t Let the Pigeon Stay Up Late! by Mo Willems 

Pigeon is not a BIT sleepy.  Nope, not at all!  But we aren’t allowed to let him stay up past his bedtime.  Kids will laugh along with you as Pigeon runs through all of his excuses, wheedling, reasons, and temper tantrums in order to escape bedtime.  Will he succeed?

 

Ish by Peter Reynolds 

Reynolds paints a vivid picture of Ramon, a carefree spirit who loves drawing.  Nothing makes Ramon more happy that drawing, that is until his brother offers him a single thoughtless remark.  With that one careless comment, Ramon’s joyful sketching turns into an aggravated struggle.  Can he ever enjoy drawing again?  Luckily for Ramon, his little sister is there to open his eyes to thinking “ish-ly” and he discovers that getting everything perfect is not all it’s cut out to be.  Kids and adults alike will love this story of encouraging creativity and innovative thinking.

 

An Awesome Book by Dallas Clayton 

With this book, kids learn to dream big and reach higher than they think they can.  Clayton shares whimsical scenarios replete with bright, vivid, quirky illustrations and fun, thoughtful rhymes.  The moral?  Hold on to the imagination of your youth and don’t be afraid to dream big!

 

Spoon by Amy Krouse Rosenthal 

This is the cute tale of Spoon, a happy utensil.  Though he’s always been fairly satisfied with life, lately he has started to feel as if being a spoon is not all it’s cracked up to be.  Fork, Knife and Chopsticks seem to have it better than him.  Perhaps greater things await him… but do they?  Kids will love the unconventional characters and relatable storyline as they learn about celebrating differences and appreciating the things that make us unique.

 

The Great Paper Caper by Oliver Jeffers 

What is happening in the forest?  The animals grow more and more confused as branches and then whole trees go missing.  Confusion turns to alarm as more of the forest disappears and their investigative work turns up empty.  A single eyewitness lead opens their eyes to bear, the culprit who’s been stealing the trees and dragging them to his home to… do what?  The police are called, an interrogation ensues and the animals hold a trial.  But none of them are expecting what happens next.  Kids of all ages will love finding the clues, learning the story of bear, and searching the funny little illustrations all while learning the importance of friendship, conservation and recycling.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Eight Historical Fiction Books for Early Teens

Historical Fiction for Teen Readers and Parents via Tipsaholic

Historical fiction for teens is a robust genre full of exceptional choices. A mixture of classic and contemporary titles, this list of provoking stories is sure to pique your teen’s interest and help promote the good practice of daily reading. 8 Historical Fiction Books for Teens via Tipsaholic

Before We Were Free by Julia Alvarez

It’s 1960 and twelve-year-old Anita de la Torreis lives with her family in the Dominican Republic under the terror of the Trujillo regime. Eager to escape the dictatorship, Anita and her family prepare to flee to America but quickly discover freedom comes at a cost.

Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry by Mildred Taylor

Author Mildred Taylor expertly captures the effects of harsh racism, poverty, and betrayal in the lives of an African American family living in the 1930s Deep South. Reminiscent of the classic To Kill a Mocking Bird, this is one piece of historical fiction no one should miss.

The Book Thief  by Markus Zusak

A heralded favorite of both teens and adults, The Book Thief is a captivating story about the redemptive power of books set against the backdrop of 1939 Nazi Germany. The film adaptation of this #1 New York Times bestseller hit theaters last year, and you can rent or own it now. 

Then by Morris Gleitzman

Felix and Zelda escape the death camp train but now they’re running for their lives. How can two kids survive Nazi-occupied Poland?  This courageous story of hope, love, and family is a page-turner your teen won’t want to put down.

Mary, Bloody Mary by Carolyn Meyer

Author Carolyn Meyer has a special knack for teen fiction and has written numerous books about famous women in history. This story focuses on the tumultuous teen years of Mary Tudor, daughter of Henry VII and half sister to Queen Elizabeth.

The Samurai’s Tale by Erik C. Haugaard

A story of redemption and honor, The Samurai’s Tale follows the orphan Taro on his quest to become a samurai and reclaim his family legacy.

My Brother Sam is Dead by James Lincoln Collier

This beloved classic tells the story of the American Revolution through the eyes of young Tim Meeker and his family. With the threat of war, and division among his own family members, Tim must decided where his loyalty lies.

The Chosen by Chaim Potok

The Chosen is a wise, mature tale centered around two boys, their fathers, and the Jewish faith. Growing up in 1940s Brooklyn, Reuven and Danny forge an unlikely friendship and together face the challenges of adolescence and religious convictions.

 

About the Author: Clarissa Fidler is a 20-something trying to find her place in this world. She grew up in Seattle, attended college in Utah, and now calls Chicago home. In her free time you’ll find her reading the New York Times, cuddling with her cat Harper, catching up on her favorite blogs, running along Lake Michigan, or checking out a new restaurant.  If you’d like to read more by Clarissa, check out her blog West Hawthorne Place.

5 Alternative Ways to Spend Super Bowl Sunday

Not a football fan? I’m not either. I don’t understand the rules, and I certainly don’t have a favorite team. If you’re like me and Super Bowl Sunday is just another Sunday to you, you’re in luck — here are five great ways to spend the day while everyone else is eating way too many greasy nachos.

5 Alternatives to Super Bowl Sunday


5 alternatives to super bowl sunday

1. Start a new series on Netflix streaming.

Watched House of Cards yet? Wondering what all the fuss is over Orange Is the New Black? Find out by spending the day in front of the television just like everyone else – minus the football.

2. Go to a movie.

Even for a newly released movie – like Labor Day with Josh Brolin and Kate Winslet (in theaters on January 31) – you likely won’t have to arrive early at the theater to get tickets. Hurray for no lines!

3. Book a dinner reservation.

You know that popular new restaurant that you’ve been dying to go? Chances are that, as long as it’s not a sports pub, on Super Bowl Sunday it will be easy to get a reservation.

4. Shop ’til you drop.

Crowds at the mall will be much smaller than usual. Take advantage of emptier stores and those coveted parking spaces right near the door.

5. Read a good book.

Fire up your Kindle and download one of the latest New York Times‘ best sellers, or check out some of Tipsaholic’s other page-turner recommendations. Enjoy the peace and quiet.

image sources: netflix, movie, dinner, shopping, book

 

Julianne Puckett is the creator of Yankee Kitchen Ninja, a blog about what she calls “stealthy homemaking” — healthy recipes that are quick and easy to prepare, DIY gardening tips and the occasional craft project. A designer, writer and former suburban-dwelling IT professional, she lives in rural Vermont, where she struggles to balance the siren call of her inner farmer with her love of cute shoes and cocktails.

 

 

4 Steps to a Great Kids’ Reading Nook

Steps and Inspiration to Create a Great Kids' Reading Nook

Picture 1 of 14

If you are a passionate reader, you know the thrill that can fill you when you pick up the right book and curl up on a porch swing. As you watch the children in your life becoming familiar with books, it’s likely you want the same for them. These ideas will help you to inspire those young minds in subtle and appealing ways through the creation of the perfect reading space within your home. If you’re not a great lover of reading [yet!], then these ideas are not only for those children, but for you.

4 Steps to Create a Great Kids Reading Nook via Tipsaholic.com

If you are a passionate reader, you know the thrill that can fill you when you pick up the right book and curl up on a porch swing. As you watch the children in your life becoming familiar with books, it’s likely you want the same for them. These ideas will help you to inspire those young minds in subtle and appealing ways through the creation of the perfect kids’ reading nook within your home. If you’re not a great lover of reading [yet!], then these ideas are not only for those children, but for you. (featured image via Sew Liberated)

Step 1: Find a place for your space.

While it would seem simplest to throw a cushion in the middle of the playroom and call it good, really give this space some thought. Will it be outside? Inside? In which room? A reading space should be easily accessible but relatively quiet, clean, and away from high traffic areas. Good light is also an important aspect of a reading environment and certainly something to consider if you are limited in light sources. If you’re wondering how to work the space into a room, check out the photo inspiration and tutorials on these 6 slides:

  • slide 1: kids reading canopy in a corner
  • slide 2: simple reading space under the stairs
  • slide 3: outdoor reading space
  • slide 4: closet reading nook
  • slide 5: kids corner reading
  • slide 6: book nook on the landing at the top of the stairs

Step 2: Build it from the floor up.

What do you picture when you think of a good reading space? Is it angular and industrial, or soft and natural? This space is going to need some work. Start simply and consider adding “custom” details as you go. Pillows, a few stuffed animals, and a light blanket are great ways to add comfort and style. If you want to get even more creative, consider a few of these ideas for cozy little nooks:

  • slide 7: DIY closet bench and bookshelves tutorial
  • slide 8: A-frame reading tent tutorial
  • slide 9: Super-simple DIY canopy tutorial
  • slide 10: Lighted reading space under loft bed
  • slide 11: Reading corner bench from pallets tutorial

Step 3: Add to your basic space.

Aside from the comfy-cozies like pillows and stuffed animals, there are other things you may want to add to your space. If it is inside, try bringing a little bit of the outdoors in. A small plant or two will add an enticing, organic freshness. Along with nature, keep in mind the different ways children may want to experience reading. Including a CD player or electronic device in the space and a number of books for listening will draw in even the most reluctant of readers. If you’re looking for more inspiration, check out these ideas at Remodelaholic. And don’t forget the books!

  • slide 12: simple add-ons for a corner reading nook

Step 4: What about the books?

The books and their location relative to the reading environment are going to be important. If you can, keep books on low shelves or in baskets near the reading space, or lying within it. Books that are out of sight will rarely be touched. If you worry about books getting chewed or otherwise demolished by younger children, you might try keeping a basket up higher and bringing it down at naptimes or when supervision is possible.

  • slide 13: nursery book slings by Smith Peas

If you want the children in your life to embrace this new reading environment, show them the way. They will be much more likely to enter the space and feel at home there if you are the one to introduce them and teach them about it. And who knows, you might just find yourself there more often than you think – without the children.

4 Steps To A Great Kids Reading Nook via Tipsaholic.com

Kayla Lilly is a photographer, writer, wife, and mama making a house a home in eastern Idaho. She met her mister while working at an amusement park and married him a year later after deciding there was no way to live without him. The amusement has continued as they’ve added three kids and a passel of pets to their lives while finishing college and starting a photography business. Drawing inspiration from the whirlwinds of marriage, parenthood, and the media, Kayla blogs at www.utterlyineperienced.blogspot.com, and spends the rest of her time chasing chickens, organizing junk drawers, diapering toddlers, and photographing everyone willing to step in front of her lens.

6 Ways Teach Your Toddler To Love Reading

Your child may not start to learn to read until kindergarten, but that doesn’t mean he or she can’t love reading before then. Toddlers love to explore and learn and try new things, so age two to five is a great time to show them how much fun a good book can be. Here are six ways to help you teach your toddler to love reading!

Teach Your Toddler To Love Reading via Tipsaholic.com

Make books available

This is so obvious it almost doesn’t need to be said, but you need to have some books on hand if you’re going to teach your toddler to love reading. Whether you buy them new or gently used, or just have a rotating pile borrowed from the library, make sure to have at least a few children’s books in your home at all times. If you don’t want to have a ton of picture books cluttering up your house, an anthology of children’s books is a great way to have lots of stories without sacrificing a ton of shelf space.

 

Let them play with books

This is a hard one for me. As a serious bibliophile, it sometimes pains me to let very young children handle books. What if they tear a page? What if they chew on it? What if they ruin it?? I’ve had to get over my need for pristine books, though, and just let the kids explore. Toddlers learn about the world by testing their limits and using as many senses as possible. Turning pages, throwing books, and yes, sometimes gnawing on the covers are all just ways for kids to figure out how books work. By allowing them to play with books, I’m teaching my girls that books are meant to be enjoyed, not just left on a shelf to collect dust. Any special books are kept out of reach, but the rest of our collection is available for any child to look at…or sit on or stack into a big pile or push around in a stroller, as the case may be!

 

Make reading part of your daily routine

I mentioned this when talking about how to teach your baby to love reading, and will probably say it again: children thrive on predictability. Find fifteen minutes in your day to have regular story time with your toddler, whether it’s right after dinner or before you leave for work in the morning or while your older kids work on homework after school. That one-on-one time will become precious to both of you, and your toddler will associate feelings of love, peace, and contentment with reading.

 

Have snacks on hand

Toddlers are busy! Sitting still and being quiet aren’t exactly their favorite things to do, but if you’re going to read together, both are necessary. So how do you keep your little one occupied while you read? Feed her. You read while she munches on apple slices.  She may seem to be paying more attention to her snack than to the story, but you might also be surprised how closely she is listening.

 

Talk about what you are reading

Reading the same books over and over again can get boring. Shake things up by talking about the pictures or asking your toddler questions about the story. Have your child identify colors, count objects, look for certain shapes or letters on a page, or make predictions about what will happen next. Activities like these can help build vocabulary, foster creativity, and improve reading comprehension.

You can also talk about books when you aren’t reading. Spotting a baby bird at the park might remind you of Are You My Mother? Reading books like How Do Dinosaurs Eat Their Food? can be helpful in teaching table manners. Harry the Dirty Dog could spark conversations about dogs, or baths, or how fun it is to play outside in the dirt. Include the stories you read in your day-to-day conversations to help your child connect them to real life.

 

Let them participate

When reading familiar books–the ones you’ve read a thousand times–let your toddler help you. This works especially well with rhyming books. For example, I will read, “I do not like…” and my daughter says, “Green eggs and ham,” then I read, “I do not like them…” and she says, “Sam-I-Am!” Your child will learn to pay closer attention and follow along, because he never knows when it will be his turn to “read” the next part!

 

Go to the library

Libraries are a great place for toddlers to learn to love reading. Many have regularly scheduled story times for young children, usually with interactive elements like songs or finger games. Talk to your librarians about ways to foster a love of reading at home. They can recommend the best new books, point you toward great classics, give you ideas for making reading fun, and suggest other resources in the community or online that can help you. If you don’t know where the nearest library to you is, look it up on LibWeb and start taking advantage of this great–and free!–resource.

 

Jen is the mother of two sweet girls; her days are filled with Dr. Seuss books and laundry, block castles and pink tutus. Reading is her first passion. Finding and testing out delicious recipes is a close second. She and her husband are working on making their fixer-upper home into something amazing. It’s a satisfying but painfully slow process. Read more from Jen at her blog: Nothing Can Come Of Nothing

5 Favorite Potty Training Books

5 Great Potty Training Books via Tipsaholic.com

Potty training isn’t a lot of fun, but you can make the experience much more fun and bearable for you and your toddler by bringing out these five potty training books. These books are funny and cheerful, but they also come with important potty training lessons.

 

5 Best Potty Training Books via Tipsaholic.com

Potty by Leslie Patricelli

This cute little board potty training book tells the story of a little toddler who doesn’t want to go in his diaper, but is unsure what to do next. He observes where his cat and dog “goes” and then figures what he needs to do next. My toddler loves the book and requests to read it every time she sits on the potty.

Danny is Done with Diapers by Rebecca O’Connell

If your toddler is learning his ABCs at the same time he’s learning how to use the potty, this book will hit two birds with one stone. With the use of lots of alliteration and detailed, colorful drawings, this potty training book shows a wide variety of potty designs and different ways to go potty, including moms and dads on the toilet and public bathrooms.

Dinosaur vs. the Potty by Bob Shea

This is a very silly and lighthearted potty training book that will have your toddler laughing and roaring at the dinosaur. The boisterous little dinosaur drinks water, plays in water, and plays in the rain and doesn’t need to go to the potty… or does he? Even though this is just a fun book, there’s still a good lesson in it: when you need to dance around the floor, it probably means that you need to go to potty!

Where’s the Poop? by Julie Markes

Flap books are popular with toddlers and this book is no exception. Teach your toddler that every animal and person needs to go to potty, including elephants, panda bears, and even penguins. For the toddler who’s scared to poop in the potty, this potty training book will alleviate that fear and show that it’s perfectly normal and good!

Even Firefighters Go to the Potty by Wendy Wax and Naomi Wax

This potty training book shows that everyone uses the potty, from firefighters to doctors, and that it’s ok to stop what you’re doing to relieve yourself. That’s an especially important lesson for busy toddlers who don’t want to stop playing to go to the potty!

 

For more books for your toddler, check out these seven essential children’s books for ages 1-3!

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

What To Read If You Loved Gone Girl

7 Book Suggestions If You Loved Gone Girl via Tipsaholic.com

Without a doubt, author Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl was one of last year’s blockbuster bestsellers. Suspenseful, a little dark, surprising plot twists, things not being what they appear – if these qualities of Flynn’s book are your cup of reading tea, here’s a list of other books that you will be sure to love. (Note: book summaries are edited versions of descriptions from Amazon.com)

7 Book Suggestions If You Loved Gone Girl via Tipsaholic

Before I Go To Sleep (S.J. Watson)

A compelling, fast-paced psychological thriller, in which an amnesiac who, following a mysterious accident, cannot remember her past or form new memories, desperately tries to uncover the truth about who she is—and who she can trust.

 

In the Woods (Tana French)

One evening in the summer of 1984 in a small Dublin suburb, three children do not return from the playing in the woods. When the police arrive, they find only one of the children, gripping a tree trunk in terror, wearing blood-filled sneakers, and unable to recall a single detail of the previous hours.

Twenty years later, when a twelve-year-old girl is found murdered in the same woods, a murder squad detective and his partner find themselves investigating a case chillingly similar to the previous unsolved mystery.

 

The Silent Wife (A.S.A. Harrison)

The Gilberts are at a bad place in their marriage. He is a committed cheater. She lives and breathes denial. He exists in dual worlds. She likes to settle scores. He decides to play for keeps. She has nothing left to lose. Told in alternating voices, The Silent Wife is about a marriage in the throes of dissolution, a couple headed for catastrophe, concessions that can’t be made, and promises that won’t be kept, as the Gilberts rush haplessly toward murder.

 

Reconstructing Amelia (Kimberly McCreight)

Kate’s in the middle of the biggest meeting of her career when she gets the telephone call from her daughter’s exclusive private school: Amelia has been suspended and Kate must get her daughter immediately. But Kate’s stress turns to panic when she arrives at the school and finds it surrounded by police, fire trucks, and an ambulance. The school tells Kate her daughter jumped to her death, a story she believes until she gets an anonymous text, telling her her daughter didn’t in fact jump.

Reconstructing Amelia is about secret first loves, old friendships, and an all-girls club steeped in tradition. But, most of all, it’s the story of how far a mother will go to vindicate the memory of a daughter whose life she couldn’t save.

 

Defending Jacob (William Landay)

Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than twenty years. He is respected in his community, tenacious in the courtroom, and happy at home with his family. But when a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: His fourteen-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.

Defending Jacob is a story of an embattled family in crisis—a suspenseful, character-driven mystery that is also a spellbinding tale of guilt, betrayal, and the terrifying speed at which our lives can spin out of control.

 

The Expats (Chris Pavone)

In the cobblestoned streets of Luxembourg, Kate Moore’s days are filled with playdates and coffee mornings, her weekends spent in Paris and skiing in the Alps. But Kate is also guarding a tremendous, life-defining secret. She suspects that another American couple are not who they claim to be; her husband is acting suspiciously; and as she travels around Europe, she finds herself looking over her shoulder, increasingly terrified that her own past is catching up with her. As Kate begins to dig, to uncover the secrets of the people around her, she finds herself buried in layers of deceit so thick they threaten her family, her marriage, and her life.

 

What the Dead Know (Laura Lippman)

Thirty years ago, the Bethany girls, ages eleven and fifteen, disappeared from a Baltimore shopping mall. They never returned, their bodies were never recovered, and only painful questions remain. Now, in the aftermath of a rush-hour hit-and-run accident, a clearly disoriented woman is claiming to be Heather, the younger Bethany sister. Not a shred of evidence supports her story, but she definitely knows something about that terrible day—and about the shocking fissures that the tragedy exposed in the foundation of a seemingly solid family.

 

Julianne Puckett is the creator of Yankee Kitchen Ninja, a blog about what she calls “stealthy homemaking” — healthy recipes that are quick and easy to prepare, DIY gardening tips and the occasional craft project. A designer, writer and former suburban-dwelling IT professional, she lives in rural Vermont, where she struggles to balance the siren call of her inner farmer with her love of cute shoes and cocktails.

5 Ways To Teach Your Baby To Love Reading

5 Ways To Help Your Baby Love Reading via Tipsaholic #baby #reading #parenting #books


Reading is important. We all know this. But is it important to read to babies? Will they even notice? Will it make a difference? YES! It is never too early to start! Here are some ideas to help teach your baby to love reading from an early age.

5 Ways To Help Your Baby Love Reading via Tipsaholic.com

1. Start sooner than you think you should

You’d be hard-pressed to teach an 18-month-old how to read, and a newborn isn’t going to know the difference between you reading and you babbling at her. So why read to them when they’re so young? Because it helps you form a habit of reading to them. That habit will prove beneficial down the road when they reach an age where they can learn to read, when they start writing their first book reports, and on through their school years. If you start reading to them daily from day one, you’re more likely to keep reading to them as they grow.

But what do you read to an infant? Simple. Skip the picture books and find something you want to read. Before my oldest turned one, we made it through The Hobbit and the entire Harry Potter series, one chapter at a time, as I nursed her before bed. Hit up the library, find yourself a good novel or memoir or self-help book, and read it aloud to your baby. If you have older kids, read age-appropriate books to them and baby at the same time. Hooray for double-dipping!

 

2. Make it a daily routine

Children thrive on predictability, so don’t just make a habit of reading to them every day; make a habit of reading to them at a certain time every day. Whether that is right after breakfast, before nap time, or after you get home from work is not important. What matters is that you make it part of your daily routine. You might be surprised at how much you both look forward to your fifteen minute break from the busyness of the day to snuggle and read together.

 

3. Choose books with bold, bright pictures and/or rhythmic, rhyming words

Once your baby becomes more social, you’ll probably want to put down Bossypants and start reading picture books together. Even before they fully understand the words you’re reading, they’ll appreciate great illustrations. Bright images are help stimulate brain development, and they help make books more interesting and memorable. Interactive books — such as Pat the Bunny or this pop-up version of The Very Hungry Caterpillar –are also great entertainment for short attentions spans.

As language develops, rhythm and rhyme will start to interest your baby as much as the pictures do. Don’t you think simple song lyrics are much easier to remember than long, boring sentences? Your baby feels the same way. He is more likely to be engaged if the story has a sing-song quality to it. He is also more likely to start memorizing those words later on, which is a good first step toward reading.

 

4. Read the same books over and over

It’s good to read a variety of books with your baby, but choose a few that you rotate through every few days. I have probably read Green Eggs and Ham and Goodnight Moon a thousand times, but my girls still love them. Repeatedly reading old favorites is not only comforting, but as language develops it will help them start to memorize the words. As I mentioned before, that is a good first step toward learning to read.

 

5. Make it fun!

Let’s face it: a lot of children’s books are boring for adults, especially if you are reading them over and over and over again. So shake things up a little. Share a bowl of strawberries while reading The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear. Do an overly dramatic reading of Llama Llama Red PajamaSing when you read Miss Mary Mack. (Come on…you remember how the tune goes!) Use puppets or stuffed animals to act out a story, or pretend to have them read it instead of you. Whatever you do, have fun with it. Your baby will be delighted at your antics, and you’ll be actively engaged instead of bored out of your gourd.

The takeaway here is that if you want your baby to learn to love reading, you should love reading too. And the only way for your baby to see that is for you to show her how much you enjoy it. So don’t be afraid to get silly and have some fun!

 

Jen is the mother of two sweet girls; her days are filled with Dr. Seuss books and laundry, block castles and pink tutus. Reading is her first passion. Finding and testing out delicious recipes is a close second. She and her husband are working on making their fixer-upper home into something amazing. It’s a satisfying but painfully slow process. Read more from Jen at her blog: Nothing Can Come Of Nothing