10 Patriotic Crafts Kids Will Love

10 patriotic crafts kids will love Tipsaholic.com #kidcrafts #patriotic

10patrioticcraftsforkids
With Independence Day coming fast, it’s likely you’ve got stars and stripes on the brain!  If you like to create with your kids, July 4th is the perfect time for some fun and colorful crafts.  We’ve wrangled up our favorite ideas from around the web to help you celebrate our country’s independence with your little ones.  All you need is some time and a few simple supplies for each crafty idea, all of which are bound to delight your kids no matter their age!  So use our 10 Patriotic Crafts to paint, cut, tie, shake, glue, glitter and create a very happy 4th of July!

1. Paper Cup and Ball Game , Red Ted Art

This is touted as a 5 minute craft, but once it’s completed you’ll have hours of entertainment!  Create origami cups and use tinfoil balls to make an old-fashioned “catch the ball in the cup” game.

Cup-Ball-Game-Craft

 

2. Paper Straw Rocket, All For The Boys

Though this isn’t technically a 4th of July craft, it certainly lends itself well to the holiday!  Create a rocket that is powered by your child!  Place the paper rocket over a straw and blow.  See how high or far you can make it fly!

paper straw rocket

 

3. Washi Tape and Ribbon Sparkler Wands, bugaboo, mini, mr & me

This is a super easy take on the “fire-free sparklers.” Even very little hands can make these since all they require are ribbons and wash tape!

sparkler wands

 

4. Pom Pom Firework Wreath, Scrumdillydilly

Pom pom wreaths are adorable no matter what season, but add some extra yarn and you’ve got a firework-inspired masterpiece!  Kids will have a blast with the yarn and love the little pom pom balls they create.

pompomwreath

 

5. Firecracker Necklace, The Experimental Home

Here’s a super simple necklace that looks good enough for the fashionably conscious to wear!  Made out of paper straws, this necklace is unique with the rustic twine knotted between.

firecracker necklace

 

6. Patriotic Bracelet, Holiday Crafts and Creations

You don’t need much to create this fun, patriotic look.  The knots in the hemp on this bracelet make it an interesting and fun craft for kids who are a little older.

patritotic bracelet

 

7. Patriotic Paper Flowers, You Can Make This

These flowers are far from complicated to make!  All you need are red, white and blue paper circles and brads!  Use them in a centerpiece, on a wreath or decorate a crown or headband for your child to wear.

paper flowers

 

8. 3-D Star Garland, Creative Juice

A star garland is nothing new, but add a little pop to yours by making your stars stand out – literally!  Kids will get a kick out of how easy it is to make the paper stars three-dimensional.

star garland

 

9. 4th of July Noisemakers, Family Chic

If Independence Day isn’t noisy enough for you, consider creating these awesome little musical instruments with your kids.  Not only do they get to make a mess painting, but they get to have a blast being noisy, too!

noisemakers

 

10. Pipe Cleaner Fireworks, She Knows

Pipe cleaners are great for fireworks!  Just bend them into shape, add some simple, cheap beads to the ends and string them up!  Hang them in front of a window, attach them to a hat, or string them in a garland.  Whatever you do with them, kids will love this easy and colorful craft.

pipecleanerfireworks

Looking for more great ideas for the 4th of July? Try these 7 Patriotic Party Activities!

 

Featured image via Family Chic.

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 FUN Toddler Chores

The earlier your child learns how to do housework, the better – and not just because it takes items off your to-do list!  Teach your kids to do chores now and it won’t be a battle to get them to clean later on in life.  Not only that, but chores can also be great teaching tools – use them to reinforce the idea of choices and consequences, rewarding hard work, and taking stewardship over belongings.  Toddler chores can teach a sense of accomplishment and pride and instill a strong work ethic that will take them far later in life.  How young should you start?  Well, here’s a list of 10 fun chores for TODDLERS!

10 Fun Chores for Toddlers!

 

10 Fun Toddler Chores via Tipsaholic

Things to remember:  Toddlers will need guidance and direction, but be sure to let them accomplish as much as they can on their own. This will help with establishing independence and self-confidence.  Avoid allowing them to use harsh and potentially harmful cleaners and detergents.  If you expect them to complete a chore on their own, make sure to keep anything they may need to accomplish the task within easy reach.  Make cleaning fun by turning on music, using a chore chart, and cleaning together.

 

1. Pick up toys and books

The easiest way to enforce this is to have him/her pick up what they are playing with before getting something else out.  You can also make this a game by playing a variation of “I Spy” – “Can you find the red car?  Where does it go?”  or “Can you pick up five red blocks?”  Picking up toys and books is easier for kids when there are clear, established spots for them.  You can find tons of great toy organization ideas in this post from Remodelaholic.

*DIY idea: Check out these chalkboard toy boxes!  They’re trendy and classy and match nearly all decor.  Plus, you can change the “labels” easily, since you only need chalk!

 

2. Help with dirty laundry

Dirty clothes are lightweight and easy for small hands to manage.  Make sure there is a distinct spot for dirty clothes – a hamper like this one is a great option for kids if you don’t have a laundry chute.  Once the dirty clothes are in the right place, your toddler can also help sort clothes by color and put them in the washing machine, under close supervision.

 

3. Sort/fold clean laundry

Once the laundry is clean, toddlers can have fun matching socks by color and size.  They can learn to fold small items that aren’t unwieldy, though it will take practice to master this skill!

 

4. Wipe up messes

Spills happen.  It’s inevitable.  Teach your kids to clean them right when they happen, so there will be less for everyone to take care of later.  Make sure there are rags or paper towels within easy reach and if needed have them use water to dampen them – no chemical-laden cleaners.

 

5. Dusting

While there may be some areas you’ll want your toddler to avoid (great grandma’s china on the buffet or your grandfather’s tchotchkes from “the Old World” perhaps) there are spots small hands can dust – window ledges, blinds, low shelves, their own dresser, baseboards… anything low and easy to reach, nothing too high or heavy.  For added fun, let them use old socks over their hands, like puppets!

 

6. Put away groceries

This can be just as fun as sorting socks!  They can help put like items together, carry lightweight items away where they belong, and take food storage items to their spots in the pantry or basement.  Supervise to make sure they don’t carry more than they can easily handle and keep in mind they may need direction.

 

7. Set and clear the table

Keep unbreakable plates, bowls and cups at easy reach in a low cupboard so toddlers can find them and carry them to the table without help and without worry of shattering them.  Use fun placemats, like these, that teach kids the proper way to lay the utensils.  When mealtime is over, kids can carry dishes to the sink and help put things away in the fridge.

 

8. Wipe the table off

Toddlers can help clean a dirty table with a washcloth, rag or paper towel and water.

 

9. Make the bed

This is a skill that takes a lot of practice to properly master, but a toddler can surely begin to work on it!  They can place their pillows and stuffed animals in their allotted places and pull sheets and blankets up.  Explain and show them how to pull the linens up to “meet the pillows” – and most importantly don’t worry if there are lumps and bumps or if the sheets are askew.  Practice makes perfect!

 

10. Help with pets

With guidance, a toddler can pour pet food into the dish or change the water.  They will likely enjoy helping dogs take walks or “exercising” the cat or rabbit!

10 Fun Chores for Toddlers via Tipsaholic

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on FacebookPinterest,Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Top 10 Easter Crafts Kids Will Love

easter crafts

 

Holidays are perfect times to break out the craft supplies and recycling.  Kids love crafts their little hands can do on their own, and springtime is rife with inspiration!  This Easter, turn egg cartons into adorable chicks, make some unique puppets, use paper in new ways and create memories with your kids as you help them craft up some fun!  Bunnies, chicks and eggs take staring roles in the top 10 Easter crafts kids will love to make.

Top 10 Easter Crafts Kids Will Love - Tipsaholic.com

1. Sharpie Eggs – mom.me

2. Wooden Spoon Chick Puppets – One Little Project

3. Origami Bunnies – Tinkerlab

4. Papier Mache Easter Baskets – Red Ted Art

5. Paint Chip Easter Egg Garland – Itsy Sparks

6. Jumping Jack Easter Bunnies – Pottery Barn Kids Blog

7. Egg Carton Chicks – Paper, Plate and Plane

8. Spring Chicks – Housing a Forest

9. Easter Pipe Cleaner Finger Puppets – Craft Jr.

10. Washi Tape Egg Canvas – ehow

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on Facebook, Pinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

10 Clever St. Patty’s Day Crafts for Kids

10 Clever St. Patty's Day Crafts for Kids

Picture 1 of 11

Saint Patrick’s Day is close at hand!  Whether you go all out with bangers and mash, leprechaun traps, green clothes from head to toe and kissing everyone Irish or not, any holiday is a great excuse to craft with your kids!  Kids love pinch-proof crafts which tend to be all about rainbows and gold glitter!  Help your little ones celebrate this very colorful holiday with these 10 clever, St. Patty’s Day crafts for kids.

10 st. patty's day crafts - Tipsaholic.com

1. Bell Pepper Shamrocks – All Kids Network

2. Paper Chain Rainbow – Mustard Seeds

3. Shamrock Bracelet – Scrumdilly-do

4. Rainbow Fruit Loops Necklace – Eighteen25

5. Four Leaf Clover Necklace – The Crafting Chicks

6. Tissue Paper Rainbow – The Artist Woman

7. Paper Shamrocks – Hands On We Grow

8. Paper Rainbow – Snap Scrap Blog Tweet

9. TP Roll Shamrocks – Child Made

10. TP Roll Leprechaun – Moments of Mommyhood

 

10 St. Patty's Day Crafts - Tipsaholic.com

 

Kimberly Mueller is the “me” over at bugaboo, mini, mr & me, a blog that highlights her creative endeavors. She especially likes to share kid crafts, sewing attempts, recipes, upcycled projects, photography and free printable gift tags/cards. When she’s not enjoying being married to her best friend, chasing after the natives (AKA her three kids) and attempting to keep the house in one piece, you can find her with a glue gun in one hand and spray paint in the other. Aside from DIY pursuits, she also enjoys writing, reading, music, singing (mostly in the shower) and the color yellow. Kimberly recently published a craft book entitled Modern Mod Podge. You can also find her on Facebook, Pinterest, Bloglovin’ and Instagram. Email her at: bugabooblog(at)yahoo.com

Dealing With Picky Eaters? Try These 7 Tips

7 Tricks For Dealing With A Picky Eater via Tipsaholic.com

Are your kids the toughest food critics you’ve ever encountered? Here are some suggestions that you can try with your picky eaters to encourage them to eat a wider variety of food.

7 Tips To Help A Picky Eater via Tipsaholic

1. Take your picky eaters to the farmer market.

Walking around at a farmer market is a great way to spend a Saturday morning. Strike up conversations with the vendors about growing crop, how they cook their food, and how they feed their animals. Ask your children to choose the vegetables, fruit, or meat to purchase. This might help them gain a better appreciation of where the food on their plate comes from.

 

2. Ask your picky eaters to help you cook meals.

Involve your child in the preparation of food. With younger kids and toddlers, your kitchen will surely become very messy in the process, but it’ll be worth it in the long run. When they help with the chopping, the seasoning, and the baking, they might become more willing to try the food. Even if they still refuse to eat, at least they’ll understand the work that goes into making the meal and they’ll be more respectful of it.

There are several great books out there about cooking with kids. Kids in the Kitchen gives some great ideas of how to cook with with kids from 18 months to 9 years old. For older kids, try Kids’ Fun & Healthy Cookbook and The Kid’s Cookbook.

 

3. Identify the food on their plates.

A plate filled with unrecognizable food can be very scary for a young person. When you place the plate in front of them, make sure to identify everything on their plate. Tell them how you cooked it and what it will taste like (sweet, savory, salty, bitter, etc).

 

4. Don’t become a short order cook.

Don’t give up and cook another meal for them. This shows them that you’re willing to cook something else… so why should they ever eat what you offer if they can simply request their favorite meal instead? Just tell them that they don’t have to eat if they don’t want to, but you won’t be cooking anything else. If you’re concerned that they’ll go hungry, include a side dish that you know they’ll enjoy.

 

5. Dinner is a sit-down event.

Try to make time for a sit-down dinner at least a few times a week. This makes dinner an event into itself, a time for the whole family to just eat and talk. Try your best to make dinnertime a positive time for everyone, not a battle over food.

 

6. Offer it again… and again.

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Sometimes it takes a few tries and refuses before a child finally eats something new. Picky eaters need to get acclimated to the taste and smell and look of a new food before they finally embrace it.

 

7. Tell your picky eaters that they won’t always be picky.

Above all, don’t tell your kids that they’re picky eaters. They’ll probably take that label and run with it. They’ll believe that they’re picky eaters and that they can’t help it. They might be less wiling to change their eating habits. Instead, say things like, “I understand you don’t want to eat it right now, but someday you will like these food just like your parents! Your tongue will get used to the taste and you’ll love it.” Your kids DO want to be just like you, believe it or not.

 

Happy cooking! For some fast and easy dinner ideas, check out Four Quick 30-Minute Paleo Dinners in 5 Steps.

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

5 Favorite Potty Training Books

5 Great Potty Training Books via Tipsaholic.com

Potty training isn’t a lot of fun, but you can make the experience much more fun and bearable for you and your toddler by bringing out these five potty training books. These books are funny and cheerful, but they also come with important potty training lessons.

 

5 Best Potty Training Books via Tipsaholic.com

Potty by Leslie Patricelli

This cute little board potty training book tells the story of a little toddler who doesn’t want to go in his diaper, but is unsure what to do next. He observes where his cat and dog “goes” and then figures what he needs to do next. My toddler loves the book and requests to read it every time she sits on the potty.

Danny is Done with Diapers by Rebecca O’Connell

If your toddler is learning his ABCs at the same time he’s learning how to use the potty, this book will hit two birds with one stone. With the use of lots of alliteration and detailed, colorful drawings, this potty training book shows a wide variety of potty designs and different ways to go potty, including moms and dads on the toilet and public bathrooms.

Dinosaur vs. the Potty by Bob Shea

This is a very silly and lighthearted potty training book that will have your toddler laughing and roaring at the dinosaur. The boisterous little dinosaur drinks water, plays in water, and plays in the rain and doesn’t need to go to the potty… or does he? Even though this is just a fun book, there’s still a good lesson in it: when you need to dance around the floor, it probably means that you need to go to potty!

Where’s the Poop? by Julie Markes

Flap books are popular with toddlers and this book is no exception. Teach your toddler that every animal and person needs to go to potty, including elephants, panda bears, and even penguins. For the toddler who’s scared to poop in the potty, this potty training book will alleviate that fear and show that it’s perfectly normal and good!

Even Firefighters Go to the Potty by Wendy Wax and Naomi Wax

This potty training book shows that everyone uses the potty, from firefighters to doctors, and that it’s ok to stop what you’re doing to relieve yourself. That’s an especially important lesson for busy toddlers who don’t want to stop playing to go to the potty!

 

For more books for your toddler, check out these seven essential children’s books for ages 1-3!

 

“I’m Elisa and I live in Austin, Texas with my husband and our two little girls. I used to teach reading and writing, but now I stay at home with my two kiddos and read and write in my spare time. I also love to undertake DIY projects, find new recipes on Pinterest, and dream about someday finally completing our home. Above all, I love to learn about new things and sharing my new-found knowledge with others.”  Please check out my blog What the Vita!

Help Your 2 to 3 Year Old Listen!

help your 2 to 3 year old listen

Sometimes getting your children to listen seems like an impossible feat, especially with young children.  When they are in that magical, but difficult 2-3 year old age.  Climbing to the top of Mount Everest seems easy in comparison.  Trying not to resort to yelling, cuz we all know, yelling is not the answer.  So, the next time you need your child to listen, try some of these easy to follow tips.

10 ways to communicate to your 2-3 year old!

(So they will listen!)

 

1. Settle Feelings:

No one will listen if there are lost of frayed nerves in the conversation.  Make sure that you take the 10 seconds to just breathe and think before discussing.  Helping your child to calm down is just as important, so they can focus, give them that time if possible.

 

2.  Avoid a Harsh or Yelling Voice:

I think it is natural in all humans, that when we get yelled at or spoken to in a harsh mean voice, we get defensive.  Instead, use a calm voice and say their name, with a simple request.  This will help them feel less attacked and they will be more willing to listen or respond.

 

3. Speak Eye to Eye:

Looking down at your child from full height, and commanding them to do something with a stern set in your eyes, is great for intimidation.. not for listening.  Instead, get down on your child’s level.   Ask them “Please look at my eyes”. Keep your eye’s expression soft (not hard).  You want to help them engage in the conversation and feel like they are being heard too.

 

4.  Short and Sweet:

Don’t rattle off a list of requests.  Make one request at a time, and be direct.  Try to keep it to one sentence.

 

5. Try to Avoid Negative Statements:

It seems like our first gut feeling is to tell them No.   No eating treats, no running, no hitting, no writing on the walls…  That is a lot of negative.   Next time, instead of yelling “No Running!”  try, “Let’s walk instead of running.”  Try to rephrase the request without using the word no.   If they don’t hear “No” every other word, they may actually respond to “No” when you absolutely have to use the word.

 

6. No If’s:

Instead of saying “If you do this… then that will happen” use the term “when”.   “When you clean up your toys, then we can go outside.”  “When,” implies that you expect them to obey,  “if,” gives them a choice as to whether or not they are going to obey.

 

7. Choices:

If you are leaving and they aren’t putting on their coat ask, “Would you like the red coat or the blue.”  Giving them a choice makes them feel more empowered and helps them want to be part of doing what needs to be done.

 

8. Help them to vocalize:

When you learn a new saying, there is nothing like reciting it out loud, to cement it in our brain.  When a child makes a mistake, you want to help them understand what is wrong.  They may not understand why they are being put in a time out, or having a toy taken away.  Discuss what happened and why they had a consequence.  Help them to apologize for what they did ” I’m sorry Mommy, I won’t hit you again.”   Having them explain why they are sorry helps them to begin to understand what they did to cross the line.

 

9. Follow through:

If you tell your child that they are going to go to time out if they throw their toys again, then you MUST follow through when they do throw their toys again.  If a child thinks you don’t mean what you say, they won’t listen when you say it.  Do not give empty warnings.

 

10.Pick Your Battles:

You don’t need to fight about everything they do.  A child needs to be able to make some choices on their own.  When my toddlers were young my doctor advised me to choose 2 or 3 things that are not allowed to do.  Be sure to discuss them with your partner, and agree that those are the things that you both will always back each other up on.  (This helps parents not to bicker amongst themselves too when a child does something that one parent tolerates but the other dislikes.)

 

11. Don’t be afraid to apologize:

Sometimes, A LOT of times, when we are human we make a mistake and react with a harsh voice or yelling.  Don’t be afraid to apologize to your child.  Your child need to know and see that when you make mistakes you try to make it right.

 

Don’t feel like you have to do them all at one time.  Just try to incorporate a few things into your day to day routine.  As they become more routine, you will see a change for the better in both the way you respond to your child and they way they respond to you!